1859.70

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Central Park a Boon to National Prowess in Base Ball, Cricket, Etc.

Salience Peripheral
Tags Newspaper Coverage, US cricket clubs
City/State/Country: New York, NY, United States
Game Base Ball, American Cricket
Immediacy of Report Contemporary
Age of Players Adult
Text

"Though we have not yet attained such proficiency in the game of cricket as to be a match for the Englishmen or Canadians, we expect to be ahead of them not very long hence.  In the meantime we have nationalized the more active game of base ball.

"The opening of the Central Park comes on most opportunely to aid in this new phase of our social development. . .  [T]he Park will be the place."

The full Herald editorial is below.

 

Sources

   New York Herald, July 20, 1859, p. 5, cols. 1-2  

Comment

Other items referring to the use of Central Park for baserunning games are at 1859.35 (base ball asks for access, 1859.56 (cricket community wary of 10-to-1 edge in local support for base ball), 1860.69 (Knickerbocker eyes way to use the Park), and 1864.36 (further hopes for base ball access.)

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Submitted by George Thompson,
Submission Note Email of 10/31/2014
Has Supplemental Text Yes

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Supplemental Text

            Out-Door Amusements.  ***  Though we have not yet attained such proficiency in the game of cricket as to be a match for the Englishmen or Canadians, we expect to be ahead of them not very long hence.  In the meantime we have nationalized the more active game of base ball.  The clubs of young men that have been formed in this city and Brooklyn to practise this sport comprise more members, we should say, than do all the other clubs of these cities combined; and thousands of young men and boys may now be found every afternoon in the outskirts acquiring health, strength and activity at this excellent game.  Foot ball, hand ball, racket ball, commons, quoits, and other old country games, are also coming into vogue.  The Germans have naturalized their Mai-fests and Sangerbunds, and the Frenchman has in out well organized pic-nic excursions a capital substitute for his fêtes champetres.

            ***  Our young men find other outlets for the exuberance of spirits and enthusiasm than they did formerly, when they had to choose between politics, fire companies and rowdyism.  Games of strength and skill, yachting, boating, and other outdoor amusements have begun to engage their attention, and these tend at once to their physical and social improvement.    ***

            The opening of the Central Park comes on most opportunely to aid in this new phase of our social developement.  All sorts of manly games and exercises that can be carried on there without public inconvenience or impropriety will be permitted and encouraged.  At least we hope so.  For riding, and driving, and walking, and sauntering, and otherwise idling away pleasantly a summer's day, the Park will be the place.  The plan of having music there one evening in the week has already been introduced to great effect, and we hope to see it made in good time a daily feature.  The public appreciation of this sort of entertainment is manifested at the present moment by the crowds that flock to the musical festival at Jones' Wood. 

            ***

            NY Herald, July 20, 1859, p. 5, cols. 1-2