Chronology:IL

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1861.46 37th Illinois plays in camp in Springfield

Location:

IL

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Wilder's History of the 37th Illinois, p. 30: "The officers and men of the [Waukegan] company were reported as playing baseball amidst beautiful weather."

This book cites a letter home by a soldier to the Waukegan Weekly Gazette, May 7, 1861. The unit was in camp near Springfield.

Waukegan had baseball as early as 1859.

Sources:

 Waukegan Weekly Gazette, May 7, 1861

Year
1861
Item
1861.46
Edit

1861.75 36th Illinois Plays base ball in Aurora Camp

Location:

IL

Age of Players:

Adult

"Hiram, of Big Rock, in lieu of it opened a boxing gymnasium. This, with base ball, filled up the intervals between meal time and drill."
History of the 36th Illinois, p. 24. This was at Camp Hammond in Aurora, IL, in 1861.

Sources:

Bennett and Haigh, History of the 36th Illinois, p. 24.

Year
1861
Item
1861.75
Edit

1862.94 Union Army Parolees Play baseball at Camp Douglas

Location:

IL

Age of Players:

Adult

The New York Sunday Mercury, Oct. 26, 1862 reports on a game of baseball at Camp Douglas, the Confederate POW camp in Chicago, on the 22nd. between two teams of Union army parolees from Companies A and F, 5th NY Artillery. The latter won 15-14, with "good pitching" shown on both sides. Se also same, Nov. 9, 1862.

Parolees were army prisoners who were at home, awaiting exchange for enemy POWs.

Year
1862
Item
1862.94
Edit

1863.101 Rebel POWs play town ball at Camp Butler

Location:

IL

Age of Players:

Adult

The diary of William W. Heartsill, Confederate soldier (published under the title "1491 Days...") says that in March 1863, while in Camp Butler POW Camp near Springfield, IL, the prisoners played "town-ball."

Sources:

Heartsill book

Year
1863
Item
1863.101
Edit

1864.25 The Hothead Union Captain and the Foul Ball

Location:

IL

Age of Players:

Adult

“The prison guard, Captain Hogendoble, struck by a foul ball from a prisoners’ baseball game, approached the batter, drew his pistol, and threatened to ‘blow their d-----d brains out.’”

Benton McAdams, “Greybeards in Blue,” Civil War Times, February 1998. Accessed 6/21/09 via Google Web search: “’greybeards in blue’ hogendoble.” The article tells the story of the 37th Iowa, comprising many older men, who were assigned in May 1864 to the military prison in Alton, Illinois. The source for this recollection is not provided.

Differences from Modern Baseball: 112
Year
1864
Item
1864.25
External
112
Edit

1864.55 Soldiers on leave play ball in Chicago

Location:

IL

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

The Chicago Tribune, June 28, 1864 reports that the Turchin Base Ball Club of the 19th Illinois Infantry will play a base ball game this afternoon at the Prairie Cricket grounds, West Madison St., Chicago. "All friends of the Nineteenth, and of this healthy and invigorating game, are expected to attend."

Basil Turchin was colonel and commander of the 19th.

Sources:

The Chicago Tribune, June 28, 1864

Year
1864
Item
1864.55
Edit

1864c.56 Confederate Prisoners Play Ball in Chicago

Location:

IL

Game:

Town Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

At Camp Douglas, a prisoner of war camp in Chicago, the Confederate army prisoners played "the old-fashioned game of ball--with a ball and bats--but no base ball" (because to the prisoner, base ball meant you had to dress up in uniforms).

Copley, "A Sketch of the Battle of Franklin...." p. 172. He was taken prisoner in late 1864, thus the ballplaying he witnessed occurred in late 1864 or early 1865.

There are mentions in other books of POWs playing base ball at Camp Douglas.

For example, the Chicago Tribune, March 25, 1862 reports that the Camp Douglas POWs played " a game of ball.... giving full play to the arms, legs and lungs." Same Oct. 19, 1863, June 9, 1862, reports that the prisoners are playing base ball and quoits. Confederate Veteran, Vol. 15, p. 234 prints the recollections of T. J. Moore, 3rd TN Infantry, who was a POW at Camp Douglas: "We were allowed to play town ball." Keller, The Story of Camp Douglas" p. 114 cites POW Curtis Burke as saying "The prisoners amuse themselves out of doors ... playing ball."

Sources:

Copley, "A Sketch of the Battle of Franklin...." p. 172

Circa
1864
Item
1864c.56
Edit


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