Chronology: 1861 - 1865

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91861 - 1865

The chronology from 1861 to 1865 (97 entries)

Contents

1861.1 Chadwick Tries to Start Richmond VA Team, but the Civil War Intervenes

Tags:

Civil War

Location:

US South

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Bill Hicklin notes (email of Feb 4, 2016) that "Chadwick visited his wife's family frequently and was disappointed that, as of the verge of the Civil War, there appeared to be no base ball clubs there at all."

Sources:

Ward, Geoffrey C., and Ken Burns, Baseball: An Illustrated History [Knopf, 1994], p.12, no ref given. 

John Thorn, email of 2/10/2008, suggests that Beadle may have more detail.

Schiff, Millen, and Kirsch also cite Chadwick's attempt, but do not give a clear date, or a source.

Query:

Is there a primary source for this claim?

Year
1861
Item
1861.1
Edit

1861.2 Stoolball Played, in Co-ed Form

Tags:

Females

Game:

Stoolball

Age of Players:

Adult

"Stoolball was played at Chailey [Sussex] in 1861. Major Lionel King . . . first saw stoolball in the early 'sixties, while still a very small boy. He watched a game in a field belonging to Eastfield Lodge, Hassocks [Sussex], and both men and maidens were playing" 

Sources:

Russell-Goggs, in "Stoolball in Sussex," The Sussex County Magazine, volume 2, no. 7 (July 1928), page 322. Note: Russell-Goggs does not give a source for this report.

Year
1861
Item
1861.2
Edit

1861.4 Henry Chadwick Links Base Ball to Rounders - But It's More "Scientific"

Game:

Rounders

"The game of base ball is, as our readers are for the most part aware, an American game exclusively, as now played, although a game somewhat similar has been played in England for many years, called 'rounders,' but which is played more after the style of the Massachusetts game. New York, however, justly lays claim to being the originators of what is termed the American Game, which has been so improved in all its essential points by them, and it scientific points so added to, that it does not stand second to either [rounders or the Mass game?] in its innate excellencies, or interesting phrases, to any national game in any country in the world, and is every way adapted to the tastes of all who love athletic exercises in the country." 

Sources:

Chadwick article in The New York Clipper (October 26, 1861). 

Comment:

This is an excerpt from a Hoboken game account.

Query:

"interesting phrases"?

Year
1861
Item
1861.4
Edit

1861.5 15,000 Watch Ice Base Ball in Bkn: Atlantic 37, Charter Oak 26.

Age of Players:

Adult

"[A] novel game of base ball was played on the skating-pond in the Eighth Ward, between the Atlantic and Charter Oak Base Ball Clubs. Ten members of each Club were selected for the match, and the game was played on skates, the prize being a silver ball. The Atlantic ten won the ball, making 37 runs to 27 by their opponents. Some 15,000 people witnessed the game." 

Sources:

"Base Ball on Skates," Philadelphia Inquirer (February 6, 1861). 

This bit was also reprinted in the pro-Confederacy Columbus OH paper The Crisis (February 14, 1861).

Coverage of the game, including the box score, appeared in The Spirit of the Times (Feb. 9), the New York Sunday Mercury (Feb. 10), and the New York Clipper (Feb. 16).

Year
1861
Item
1861.5
Edit

1861.6 The Clipper Looks Back on the 1861 Season

Tags:

Holidays

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Some general points:

The War: "[D]espite the interruptions and drawbacks occasioned by the great rebellion [it] has been really a very interesting year in the annals of the game, far more than was expected . . . ; but the game has too strong a foothold in popularity to be frowned out of favor by lowering brows of 'grim-faced war,' and if any proof was needed that our national game is a fixed institution of the country, it would be found in the fact that it has flourished through such a year of adverse circumstances as those that have marked the season of 1861."

HolidayPlay: "On the 4th of July, all the club grounds were fully occupied, that day, like Thanksgiving, being a ball playing day."

Juiced Ball? On July 23, it was Eagles 32, Eckfords 23, marking the Eckfords' first loss since 1858. "The feature of the contest was the unusual number of home runs that were made on both sides, the Eckfords scoring no less than 11, of which Josh Snyder alone made four, and the Eagles getting five." 3000 to 4000 fans watched this early slugfest.

Sources:

The Clipper (date omitted in scrapbook clipping) printed a long review of the 1861 season. It appeared in the issues of Jan. 11, Jan. 18, and Jan. 25, 1862.

Year
1861
Item
1861.6
Edit

1861.7 Ontario Lads to Try the New York Game, May Forego "Canadian Game"

Location:

Canada

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

The year-old Young Canadian Base Ball Club [Woodstock, ON] met in Spring 1861, elected officers, reported themselves "flourishing" with forty members, and basked in the memory of a 6-0 1860 season. "At the last meeting of the club it was resolved that they should practice the New York game for one month, and if at the end of that time they liked it better than the Canadian game, they would adopt it altogether."  

See also #1820s.19, #1838.4, #1856.18, and #1860.29 above.

Sources:

The New York Clipper (date omitted in scrapbook clipping; from context it was about May 1861). Note- not found in May issues

Year
1861
Item
1861.7
Edit

1861.8 Vermont Club Forms

Location:

New England

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

A club formed in Chester, VT.

Sources:

The New York Clipper, April 20, 1861

Year
1861
Item
1861.8
Edit

1861.9 Buckeye BBC Forms in Cincinnati OH

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"The Buckeye Base Ball Club is the first institution of the kind organized in Cincinnati." 

Sources:

The New York Clipper, April 20, 1861

Query:

does this imply that this club was the first in town to play the New York game?

Year
1861
Item
1861.9
Edit

1861.10 Atlantic 52, Mutual 27, 6 Innings: Reporter is Wowed by 26-Run 3rd

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Going into the 3rd inning, the Brooklyn club trailed 8-7. Three outs later, the Atlantic led 33-8. Ball game! The article put it this way: "The Atlantics have always had a reputation for superior batting; but never have they before displayed, nor, in fact, had there ever been witnessed on any field, in all our base ball experience - which covers a period of ten years - such a grand exhibition of splendid batting. . . . Altogether, the game exhibited the tallest batting, and more of it, than has ever before been witnessed." He goes on to chronicle every at-bat of the Atlantic's thumping third. As for the crowd: "The best of order was preserved on the ground by an extensive police force, and everything passed off well."

 

 

Sources:

"A Grand Exhibition," New York Sunday Mercury (October 20, 1861).

The full article and box score of the 10/26/1861 game is found at http://www.covehurst.net/ddyte/brooklyn/favorite%207.html

Year
1861
Item
1861.10
Edit

1861.11 Meeting of National Association is Subdued

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Meeting in late 1861, the National Association of Base Ball Players undertook no large issues, perhaps in light of what a reporter called "the disturbed state of the country." Sixty-one clubs attended, one-third less strength that in 1860.

 

Sources:

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, December 12, 1861, page 11.

Meeting summaries also appeared in the New York Sunday Mercury (Dec. 15), Wilkes' Spirit of the Times (Dec. 21), and the New York Clipper (Dec. 21)

Year
1861
Item
1861.11
Edit

1861.12 Modern Base Ball Comes to Sanford ME

Game:

Base Ball

"The national game of base-ball was introduced in 1861."

 

Sources:

Edwin Emery, The History of Sanford Maine (Fall River MA, 1901), page 383.

Comment:

 Sanford ME is about 30 miles N of Portsmouth NH, near the NH border.

Year
1861
Item
1861.12
Edit

1861.13 Modern Game Comes to the Eastern OH Town

Game:

Base Ball

"The Portage County Democrat reported in its April 10, 1861 edition, 'The young men of Ravenna have organized a base ball club . . . .' But again, their games were intra club affairs."

 

Sources:

John Husman, "Ohio's First Baseball Game," Presented at the SABR Convention, July 16, 2004, page 5.

Comment:

 Ravenna OH is about 35 miles SE of Cleveland in eastern Ohio.

Year
1861
Item
1861.13
Edit

1861.14 "Silver Ball" Match Features Brooklyn and New York All-Stars, Attracts Up To 15,000

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

 Harry Wright played 3B for New York, and atop the Brooklyn lineup were Dickie Pearce and Jim Creighton. The major NYC area clubs contributed leading players to this game, the first since 1858 to pit all-stars from New York and Brooklyn. New York held a 4-2 lead through 4 innings, but a 7-run fifth ["considerable muffy fielding took place by the New Yorkers"] propelled Brooklyn to a 18-6 win, and the silver ball was put in the hands of the Atlantic club, as its players had scored the most runs. Crowd estimates of 12,000 to 15,000 were printed. The game was played at the Gotham club grounds in Hoboken on October 21.

 

Comment:

Sponsored by the New York Clipper, the game's organizer, Clipper base ball editor Henry Chadwick, was roundly criticized for favoritism toward Brooklyn and sloppy organization by the New York Atlas and the New York Sunday Mercury in their issues of Oct. 27, 1861

Year
1861
Item
1861.14
Edit

1861.15 First Sunday in the Army: "Ball-playing, Wrestling, and Some Cards

Tags:

Civil War

Location:

Illinois

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

In early May 1861, the new 13th Illinois Regiment assembled in East St. Louis IL. Writing of the first Sabbath in the camp, the veterans later said "There was drill: so the notion of the leaders ran. A better view obtains now. There was ball-playing and wrestling and some card-playing, but that [just the card-playing?] was generally regarded as out of order."

 

Sources:

Military History and Reminiscences of the Thirteenth Regiment of the Illinois Volunteer Infantry (Woman's Temperance Publishing, Chicago, 1892), page 10. PBall file: CW-122. 

Comment:

This may be the first recorded instance of ballplaying by Civil War soldiers.

Year
1861
Item
1861.15
Edit

1861.16 NY Regiment Plays "Favorite Game" After Dress Parade in Elmira NY

Tags:

Civil War

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"After [the camp's dress] parade, which generally lasted about an hour, the camp was alive with fun and frolic . . . leap-frog, double-duck, foot and base-ball or sparring, wrestling, and racing, shared their attention."

A visitor to the camp wrote the next day, "I was not surprised . . . to see how extensively the amusements which had been practiced in their leisure hours in the city [Buffalo?], were continued in camp. Boxing with gloves, ball-playing, running and jumping, were among these. The ball clubs were well represented here, and the exercise of their favorite game is carried on spiritedly by the Buffalo boys." [page 43.] PBall file: CW-123.

Sources:

J. Harrison Mills, Chronicles of the Twenty-First Regiment, New York Volunteers (21st Veteran Assn., Buffalo, 1887), page 42. 

Comment:

The newly-formed regiment, evidently raised in the Buffalo area, was at camp in Elmira in May 1861 in this recollection, and would deploy to Washington in June. 

Year
1861
Item
1861.16
Edit

1861.17 American Guard [71st NY Regt] 42, Nationals BB Club 13

Tags:

Civil War

Location:

US South

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"The National Base Ball Club requests the pleasure of your company on their grounds at the intersection of Maryland Avenue and 6th Street, East, on Tuesday, July 2d [1861], at twelve o'clock, to witness a match game with the 71st Regiment Base Ball Club"

 

 

Sources:

71st Regiment Veterans Association, "History of the 71st Regiment, N.G., N.Y.," (Eastman, New York, 1919), pages 157, 232, and 236-237. Accessed 5/30/2009 via Google Books search "71st regiment baseball." PBall file: CW-3.

Comment:

The 71st had the duty to protect the Nation's Capital against rebel incursions, and fielded a picked nine to play a National BBC nine. After three innings, they led 12-2, and coasted to victory. A familiar name for the 71st was 3b Van Cott, and for the Nationals French played 3b. The regimental history later reported that the game "was witnessed by a large number of spectators." The Philadelphia Inquirer announced the contest on July 1 under the headline "The New York Seventy-First Despairing of Work, Going to Play Ball." Note: Frank Ceresi reports [19CBB posting of 2/28/2009] that the French collection of the Washington Historical Society includes a handwritten scoresheet for the match, which describes a 41-13 Army victory.

The two sides played again a year later. On August 7, 1862, the Nationals won a rematch, 28-13. The regimental history says that "the game was played on the parade ground; the result was not as satisfactory to the boys as the year before. There was quite a concourse of spectators on the occasion, including a number of ladies . . . . At the close the players were refreshed with sandwiches and lager." On June 25th, 1862, and the regiment's company K took on the rest of the regiment and lost 33-11.

Year
1861
Item
1861.17
Edit

1861.18 Confederate Base Ball Players Finds Field "Too Boggy" in VA

Tags:

Civil War

Location:

US South

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"Confederate troops played townball as well as more modern versions of the game in their army camps. In November 1861 the Charleston Mercury of South Carolina reported that Confederate troops were stuck in soggy camps near Centreville, Fairfax County, [northern] Virginia. Heavy rains created miserably wet conditions so that 'even the base ball players find the green sward in front of the camp, too boggy for their accustomed sport.'" Centreville is adjacent to Manassas/Bull Run. 40,000 Confederate troops under Gen. Johnson had winter quarters there [the town's population had been 220] in 1861/62.

 

Sources:

Charleston Mercury, November 4, 1861, page. 4, column 5. Mentioned without citation in Kirsch, Baseball in Blue and Gray (Princeton U, 2003), page 39. PBall file: CW-6

Year
1861
Item
1861.18
Edit

1861.19 Second NJ Regiment Forms BB Club in Virginia Camp

Tags:

Civil War

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] A six-inning game of base ball was played at Camp Seminary on Saturday November 16, 1861. The 2nd NJ challenged the 1st NJ and prevailed. A member of the 2nd NJ sent a short report and box to the Newark newspaper.

[B] Members of the 2nd New Jersey regiment formed the Excelsior club, evidently named for the Newark Excelsior [confirm existence?] in late November 1861. A report of an intramural game between Golder's side and Collins' side appeared in a Newark paper. The game, won 33-20 by the Golder contingent, lasted 6 innings and took four hours to play. The correspondent concludes: "The day passed off pleasantly all around, and I think every one of us enjoyed ourselves duely [sic?]. We all hope to be at home one year hence to dine with those who love us. God grant it!"

 

Sources:

[A] "A Game of Ball in the Camp," Newark Daily Advertiser, November 20 1861. PBall file: CW7.

[B] Newark Daily Advertiser, 12/4/1861. PBall file: CW8.

Comment:

Camp Seminary was located near Fairfax Seminary in Alexandria VA, near Washington DC. 

One may infer that the 2nd NJ remained at winter quarters in Alexandria VA at this time, providing protection to Washington. 

Year
1861
Item
1861.19
Edit

1861.20 Confederate Soldier's Diary Reports on Town Ball Playing, 1861-1863

Tags:

Civil War

Location:

US South

Game:

Town Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

December 1861 (Texas?): "There is nothing unusual transpiring in Camp. The boys are passing the time playing Town-Ball."

January 1862 (Texas?): "All rocking along finely, Boys playing Town-Ball"

March 1863 (USA prison camp, IL?): The Rebels have at last found something to employ both mind and body; as the parade ground has dried up considerably in the past few days, Town Ball is in full blast, and it is a blessing for the men."

March 1863 (USA prison camp, IL?): "Raining this morning, which will interfere with ball playing, but the manufacture of rings 'goes bravely on,' and I might say receives a fresh impetus by the failure of the 'Town-ball' business."

 

Sources:

W. W. Heartsill, Fourteen Hundred and 91 Days in the Confederate Army: A Journal Kept by W. W. Heartsill: Day-by-Day, of the W. P. Lane (Texas) Rangers, from April 19th 1861 to May 20th 1865. Submitted by Jeff Kittel, 5/12/09. Available online at The American Civil War: Letters and Diaries Database, at http://solomon.cwld.alexanderstreet.com/. PBall file: CW10.

Comment:

Heartsill joined Lane's Texas Rangers early in the War at age 21. He was taken prisoner in Arkansas in early 1862, and exchanged for Union prisoners in April 1863. He then joined Bragg's Army in Tennessee, and was assigned to a unit put in charge of a Texas prison camp of Union soldiers. There are no references to ballplaying after 1863.

Query:

manufacture of rings?

POWs commonly fashioned hair or bone rings to while away the time [ba].

Year
1861
Item
1861.20
Edit

1861.22 Ad Biz

Game:

Base Ball

"(advertisement) JOHN C. WHITING, 87 FULTON STREET, N. Y., manufacturer of BASE BALLS and Wholesale and Retail Dealer in everything appertaining to BASE BALL and CRICKET. Agent for Chicester's Improved SELF-FASTENING BASES, and the PATENT CONCAVE PLATES for Ball Shoes, which are free from all the danger, and answer all the purposes, of spikes."

Sources:

New York Sunday Mercury, Dec. 8, 1861

Comment:

With thousands in the Greater New York City area playing the game, providers of playing grounds, playing manuals, and equipment sprang up.

Year
1861
Item
1861.22
Edit

1861.23 War Sinks Silver Balls

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Youth, Adult

[A] "CONTESTS FOR THE CHAMPIONSHIP.-- Additional interest will be imparted to the ensuing base ball season by the playing of a series of contests between the senior, as well as between the junior clubs, for a silver champion ball (and)...will initiate a new system of general rivalry, which will, we hope, be attended with the happiest results to the further progress and popularity of the game of base ball.

[B] "We learn from Daniel Manson, chairman pro tem. of the Junior National Association, that the Committee on Championship have resolved to postpone the proposed match games for the championship...Among the reasons...is the fact that quite a number of the more advanced players, from the clubs selected for the championship, have enlisted for the war."

[C] The senior-club silver ball competition, offered not by the national association but by the Continental BBC, a non-contender, was also not held due to the war. In 1862, with the war then appearing to be of indefinite duration, the Continental offered it as a prize to the winner of the informal championship matches, with those games played as a benefit for the families of soldiers.

Sources:

[A] New York Sunday Mercury, April 7, 1861

[B] New York Sunday Mercury, May 12, 1861

Year
1861
Item
1861.23
Edit

1861.37 Modern Base Ball Played Widely At Outset of War

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] After having doubled in scope in bother 1857 and 1858, the game was played in all of America's largest 12 cities in 1858.  It was played in the top 21 cities exceeding 42,000 population, and in about one-half of the largest 100 US cities (the smallest of which had a population of 9,500) before the Civil War started in April 1861.  Twenty-seven of the thirty-four States had seen the game by then.

[B] Expansion slowed considerably during the war years, but have have aboiut 150 accounts of playing in war camps during the fighting.. 

 

Sources:

[A] See Larry McCray, "Recent Ideas about the Spread of Base Ball after 1854" (draft), October 2012.  Data from the Protoball Games Tabulation (version 1.0) compiled by Craig Waff.

[B] For about 150 accounts of ballplaying by soldiers during the War, go to the Civil War Camps Chronology.

Year
1861
Item
1861.37
Edit

1861.39 WAR!

Tags:

Civil War

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] "BASE BALL. The excitement incident to the new and warlike attitude of our national affairs also monopolized the attention of everybody during the past week; and out-door sports, like everything else, were for the time forgotten."

[B] "BASE BALL'. For the time being, base ball is almost entirely laid aside. Not one of the senior clubs has yet mustered sufficient numbers on the regular play-days to have a game...Several of the clubs have, we understand, resolved to postpone regular field exercise until after the Fourth of July."

Sources:

[A] New York Sunday Mercury, April 21, 1861

[B] New York Sunday Mercury, April 28, 1861

Year
1861
Item
1861.39
Edit

1861.40 Shortstops to Soldiers

Tags:

Civil War

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] "BASE BALL...So many of the best players, belonging to the first nines of the more prominent base ball clubs, have enlisted and gone with different regiments to the seat of war, that there will be some difficulty in getting up any matches of special interest this season."

[B] "BASE BALL...Hundreds of the best base all players in the States are now withing or on their way to Washington, ready to prove to the world, that while in times of peace they are enthusiastic devotees of the National Game, they are no less ready, in time of war, to make any sacrifice..."

[C] "CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE WAR.-- The Star and Exercise Clubs, of Brooklyn, have together contributed nearly forty volunteers for the war. Good boys!"

Sources:

[A] New York Sunday Mercury, April 28, 1861

[B] New York Sunday Mercury, May 5, 1861

[C] New York Sunday Mercury, May 26, 1861

Year
1861
Item
1861.40
Edit

1861.41 Base Ball A Silver Lining

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] "The first base ball match of the season came off yesterday...It was thought that cannon balls would supersede base balls this season-- that our meetings and delightful measures would be exchanged for the pride, pomp, and circumstances of glorious war, but even in their ashes live our wonted fires, and though faint and few, we are fearless still. The event of yesterday is therefore generally regarded as a promising sign of the times."

[B] "THE HOBOKEN BASE BALL CLUBS.-- The ball grounds at the Elysian Fields, Hoboken, begin to wear a very lively look...Several important matches are nearly arranged...The return of the Seventh, National Guard, added a reinforcement of some forty members to our prominent base ball clubs."

Sources:

[A] Brooklyn Daily Eagle, June 6, 1861

[B] Wilkes' Spirit of the Times, June 16, 1861

Year
1861
Item
1861.41
Edit

1861.45 Shrunken NABBP Meeting Does Little

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"BASE BALL. Annual Meeting of the National Association of Base Ball Players....The attendance of delegates was not so large as we had hope to see..the delegates of thirty-one clubs answered to their names...The Committee on Rules...reported that they had no changes in the Rules to recommend...only one proposition had been submitted to them (discussion of a proposition to change the rule for deciding the outcome of a game called by darkness was tabled; a resolution to donate the Association's surplus funds to war relief was also tabled, as the funds were small...the existing rebellion, which has enlisted amny base-ball players in the service of the country, has had a tendency to temporarily disorganize many of the base ball clubs."

Sources:

New York Sunday Mercury, Dec. 15, 1861

Comment:

Three clubs were admitted to the Association; of 80 existing members, nine were expelled due to non-payment of dues for two years, and 27 more listed who had not paid for 1861.

Year
1861
Item
1861.45
Edit

1861.46 37th Illinois plays in camp in Springfield

Tags:

Civil War

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Wilder's History of the 37th Illinois, p. 30: "The officers and men of the [Waukegan] company were reported as playing baseball amidst beautiful weather."

This book cites a letter home by a soldier to the Waukegan Weekly Gazette, May 7, 1861. The unit was in camp near Springfield.

Waukegan had baseball as early as 1859.

Sources:

 Waukegan Weekly Gazette, May 7, 1861

Year
1861
Item
1861.46
Edit

1862.1 Brooklyn Games Organized as Benefits for Sick and Wounded Soldiers

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Three games were announced in June 1862 for which net proceeds would be used for sick and wounded Union soldiers. The Eckfords and the Atlantics would play for a silver ball donated by the Continental Club. William Cammeyer provided the enclosed Union grounds without charge. Admission fees of 10 cents were projected to raise $6000 for soldiers' relief. The Eckford won the Silver Ball by winning two of three games.

 

Sources:

"Relief for the Sick and Wounded," Brooklyn Eagle, June 21, 1862, page 2.

Craig Waff, "The 'Silver Ball' Game-- Eckfords vs. Atlantics at the Union Grounds", in Inventing Baseball: The 100 Greatest Games of the 19th Century (SABR, 2013), pp. 39-42

Year
1862
Item
1862.1
Edit

1862.2 The Death of Jim Creighton at 21

Tags:

Hazard

Location:

NYC

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Excelsior star pitcher James Creighton, 21 years old, suffered some sort of injury during the middle innings of a game against the Union of Morrisania on October 14, 1862, and died four days later of a "strangulated intestine" associated with a hernia. (Other accounts cite a ruptured bladder - ouch.) One legend was that Creighton suffered the injury in the process of "hitting out a home run." Excelsior officials attributed the death to a cricket injury incurred in a prior cricket match.

Creighton was perhaps base ball's first superstar.

 

Sources:

R. M. Gorman and D. Weeks, Death at the Ballpark (McFarland, 2009), pages 63-64.

Richard Bogovich, "The Martyrdom of Jim Creighton-- Excelsiors of Brooklyn vs. Unions", in Inventing Baseball: The 100 Greatest Games of the 19th Century (SABR, 2013), pp. 43-46

Comment:

Tom Shieber, Hall of Fame curator who has studied Creighton extensively, believes the injury was an inguinal hernia which ruptured. In an article published on December 7, 1862, the New York Sunday Mercury recounts a conversation with Creighton before the Union game in which he states that he had injured himself in a recent cricket match. It is assumed that he received the hernia in the cricket match and that it ruptured during the Union game.

Year
1862
Item
1862.2
Edit

1862.3 US Cricket Enters Steeper Decline

Game:

Cricket

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] "The cricket season last year was a very dull one, this clubs in this locality [Brooklyn] playing but a few matches, and those of no importance."  The recent delline:

[B] "For several years, cricketers had been talking of forming as association similar to that set up by the baseball fraternity. Despite several meetings, they had not done so. At the annual convention of 1862, the Clipper noted the meager attendance and proclaimed the gathering 'a mere farce.' It despaired of cricket ever becoming popular unless it was made more American in nature. The disappointing convention was the last the cricketer would hold."

 

Sources:

[A] Brooklyn Eagle, April 25, 1862. Contributed by Bill Ryczek, December 29, 2009.

[B] William Ryczek, Baseball's First Inning (McFarland, 2009), page 105. The Clipper quoted is the May 24, 1862 issue.

See also Beth Hise, "American Cricket in the 1860s: Decade of Decline or New Start?," Base Ball Journal, Volume 5, number 1 (Special Issue on Origins), pages 143-148.

Year
1862
Item
1862.3
Edit

1862.4 State Championship Base Ball Game in PA

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"Base Ball Match. - A grand base ball match will take place at the St. George's Cricket Ground, near Camac's Wood, for the championship of Pennsylvania, between the 'Olympic' and 'Athletic' Clubs, on next Saturday."

The New York Sunday Mercury reported on Oct. 12 that the Olympic won, 19-18, and that it was the first of a best two-of-three match.   

Sources:

Philadelphia Inquirer, October 2, 1862. Accessed via subscription search May 20, 2009. 

Query:

On what authority did it convey championship status?

Year
1862
Item
1862.4
Edit

1862.5 Brooklynites and Philadelphians Play Series of Games

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Various assortments of leading players from Brooklyn and Philadelphia vied in both cities in 1862. Philadelphia sent an all-star assortment north in June, where it lost to Newark and to select nines in Brooklyn's eastern and western districts, but beat an aggregation of Hoboken players. Two select Brooklyn nines headed south and played two all-Philly sides in early July.

At the end of August, the Mutual club traveled to Philadelphia, winning 2 of 3 against Phila clubs. In October, the Eckford traveled to Philadelphia for a week of play against individual local clubs, and also played an "amalgamated nine" of locals, winning all games played.

 

Sources:

Sources: various, including overviews at "Philadelphia vs. Brooklyn," Wilkes Spirit, July 12, 1862, and "Base Ball Match," Philadelphia Inquirer, October 22, 1862.

Year
1862
Item
1862.5
Edit

1862.6 Harvard Seeks Base Ball Rivals, Settles on Brown

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Youth

"Base-Ball, the second in importance of [Harvard] University sports, is even younger than Rowing [which still prevailed]. It originated apparently, in the old game of rounders. Up to 1862 there were two varieties of base-ball - the New York and the Massachusetts game. In the autumn of 1862 George A. Flagg and Frank Wright organized the Base Ball Club of the Class of '66, adopting the New York rules; and in the following spring the city of Cambridge granted use of the Common for practice. A challenge was sent to several colleges: Yale replied that they had no club, but hoped soon to have one; but a game was arranged with Brown sophomores, and played at Providence [RI] June 27, 1863. The result was Harvard's first victory."

 

Sources:

D. Hamilton Hurd, compiler, History of Middlesex County, Massachusetts (J. W. Lewis, Philadelphia, 1890), page 137. Accessed 2/18/10 via Google Books search <"flagg and frank" hurd>. 

Frank Wright wrote another version in James Lovett, Old Boston Boys and the Games They Played (Riverside Press, 1907). Accessed in Google Books.

 

Warning:

This was not Harvard's introduction to the New York game.  See entry 1858.51.

Comment:

Flagg and Wright reportedly had played avidly at Phillips Exeter Academy. See entry #1858c.57 above.

Year
1862
Item
1862.6
Edit

1862.7 "Massachusetts Balls" on Sale in Rochester NY

Tags:

Equipment

An advertisement in a Rochester paper offered "New York Regulation Size Ball, Massachusetts Balls, Children's Rubber and Fancy Balls, Wholesale and Retail."

 

Sources:

Rochester[NY] Union and Advertiser, April 28, 1862. Posted to the 19CBB listserve by Priscilla Astifan on May 14, 2005. 

Comment:

We know that an "old-fashioned base ball" was being played in Central New York prior to the Civil War: see #1858.48 and #1860.45 above.

Year
1862
Item
1862.7
Edit

1862.8 Earliest Base Ball in Colorado Territory

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"The first baseball games in Colorado Territory occurred in March 1862, when the Base Ball (two words back then) Club was formed. The first recorded contest happened on April 26, 1862."

 

 

Sources:

Rocky Mountain News, March 13 and April 29, 1862. Cited in Brian Werner, "Baseball in Colorado Territory," in Thomas L. Altherr, Above the Fruited Plain: Baseball in the Rocky Mountain West (SABR Convention Publication, July 2003), page 71. 

Comment:

Werner identifies the game as the New York game.

Richard Hershberger, email of 1/19/2009, writes that on April 29 the Denver [CO] Daily Evening News reported on intramural game played by the Denver Base Ball Club, a likely reference to the games cited by Werner. He also notes that a March 12 issue of the Evening News referred to a "game played yesterday [that] went off well, considering that there were but two or three persons engaged who had ever played the game before, according to the New York rules, and it will take but a few more meetings to enable them to become proficient."

Jim Wohlenhaus, email of 2/24/2014, reports his own attempts to pin down Colorado's earliest games -- see the Supplemental Text, below.  Jim's summary:

"The first recorded game was March 11, 1862 and not March 15.  I do not believe the March 15 scheduled game ever was played.

"The Club was formally established on Mar 15, 1862.  I am not sure if the first three games were played on April 26, or earlier.  A comment in Protoball entry #1862.8 states these games were “intramural”.  I would hazard a guess they were indeed, probably the first nine vs. the second nine.  Since this was the only Club around, this was probably the only way to have competition.  As an aside, I have found no mention of another Club until 1864 in Colorado Territory when two Clubs formed and challenged each other.  Then baseball really started to take off in that year."

Year
1862
Item
1862.8
Edit
Source Text

1862.9 First Admission Fees for Baseball?

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

May 15, 1862: "The Union Baseball Grounds at March Avenue and Rutledge Street in Brooklyn is opened, the first enclosed ball field to charge an admission fee."

Sources:

James Charlton, The Baseball Chronology (Macmillan, 1991), page 15.

Regarding the opening of the Union Grounds, see:

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Feb. 12 and May 16, 1862; New York Clipper, Feb. 22, 1862; New York Sunday Mercury May 11 and May 18, 1862,

Warning:

Caveats: Admission was charged in 1858 for the Brooklyn-New York games at the Fashion Race Course, Queens, which was enclosed but not a 'ball field'. 

             Before the Union Grounds, there were no ball field enclosed for the purpose of charging admission.

Comment:

Admission had occasionally also been charged for "benefit" games for charities or to honor prominent players.

Year
1862
Item
1862.9
Edit

1862.10 PA Base Ball Moves Beyond Philadelphia

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"Base Ball Match. Harrisburg, August 21. - The first match game of base ball ever play in Pennsylvania, outside of Philadelphia, cam off here yesterday, between the Mountain Club of Altoona, and the Keystone Club of Harrisburg. It resulted in a victory for the latter."

 

Sources:

PhiladelphiaInquirer, August 22, 1862. Accessed 5/20/2009 via subscription search. 

Warning:

See 1860.38. Either the 1860 game in Allegheny was unknown, or not considered to have been played under National Association rules.

Comment:

Harrisburg PA is in central PA, about 90 miles W of Philadelphia. 

Year
1862
Item
1862.10
Edit

1862.11 Banned in Boston's Public Garden: "Games of Ball, Foot-ball"

Tags:

Bans

Location:

New England

Game:

Base Ball

"Sect. 10. No person or persons shall, without the consent of the mayor or board of aldermen, engage in games of ball, foot-ball, or other athletic sports, upon the public garden."

 

Sources:

Ordinance and Rules and Order of the City of Boston (Mudge and Son, Boston, 1869), page 132. Accessed 2/18/10 via Google Book search ("ball, foot-ball" ordinances 1869). 

Comment:

A note identifies this section as having been written in 1862, along with one that prohibits shaking carpets on public lands, including streets, lanes, alleys, etc.

Year
1862
Item
1862.11
Edit

1862.12 Reverend Beecher: Base-Ball is Best Form of Exercise

Tags:

Famous

Game:

Base Ball

Notables:

Henry Ward Beecher

"It is well, therefore, that so many muscular games are coming into vogue. Base-ball and cricket are comparatively inexpensive, and open to all, and one can hardly conceive of better exercise."

 

Sources:

Henry W. Beecher, Eyes and Ears (Sampson Low, London, 1862), age 191. Accessed 2/18/10 via Google Books search ("vogue baseball" beecher). 

Comment:

Beecher is here lauding exercise that is both vigorous and inexpensive.

Year
1862
Item
1862.12
Edit

1862.13 Government Survey: Athletic Games Forestall Woes of Soldiers Gambling

Age of Players:

Adult

After examining nearly 200 regiments, the Sanitary Commission [it resembled today's Red Cross] was reported to have found that "in forty-two regiments, systematic athletic recreations (foot ball, base ball, &c) were general. In one hundred and fifty-six, there were none. Where there were none, card playing and other indoor games took their place. This invited gambling abuses, it was inferred.

 

Sources:

"War Miscellanies. Interesting Army Statistics," Springfield [MA] Republican, January 25, 1862. Accessed via Genealogybank, 5/21/09. PBall file: CW13.

Query:

is it worth inspecting the report itself in search of further detail? It is not available online in May 2009. 

Year
1862
Item
1862.13
Edit

1862.14 22nd MA beats 13th NY in the Massachusetts Game

Location:

New England

"Fast Day (at home) April 3, there was no drill, and twelve of our enlisted men challenged an equal number from the Thirteenth New York, to a game of base-ball, Massachusetts game. We beat the New-Yorkers, 34 to 10."

 

Sources:

J. L. Parker and R. G. Carter, History of the Twenty-Second Massachusetts Infantry (The Regimental Association, Boston, 1887), pages 79-80. 

Comment:

Fast Day in MA was traditionally associated with ballplaying. The 22nd MA, organized in Lynnfield MA (about 15 miles N of Boston), was camped at Falmouth VA in April, as was the 13th NY. The 13th was from Rochester and would likely have known the old-fashioned game. PBall file: CW-126.

Year
1862
Item
1862.14
Edit

1862.15 NY and MA Regiments Play Two Games Near the Civil War Front

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Mr. Jewell, from the 13th NY Regiment's Company A, provided a generous [15 column-inches] account of two regulation NY-rules games played on April 15, 1862, near the Confederate lines at Yorktown VA. Sharing picket duties with members of the 22nd MA Regiment, Jewell says that "at about half-past 10 o'clock some one proposed a game of Base Ball. Sides were chosen and it commenced." [As scorer, Jewell's box scores did not mark the sides as a contest between regiments, and it may have involved mixed teams. He did note that the leadoff batter/catcher for the "Scott" side was a member of Boston's Trimountain Base Ball Club.] "It was decidedly 'cool' to play a game of Base Ball in sight of the enemy's breastworks." Between games the ball was re-covered with leather from a calf boot found on the ground. During the afternoon game, Union troops in the area were evidently sending artillery fire out toward the Rebs as they were building new fortifications in the distance. General McClelland's entourage is reported to have passed toward the front while the game was in progress. Jewell sent his account to the Rochester paper. The two games, each played to a full mine innings, were won by Scott's side, 13-9 and 14-12.

 

Sources:

Source: Rochester Union and Advertiser, April 24, 1862, page 2, column 2. PBall file: CW16.

Year
1862
Item
1862.15
Edit

1862.16 13th Massachusetts Plays Ball Near Officers, Dignitaries, Enemy Lines

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"In the afternoons, after battalion drill, the game of base-ball daily occupied the attention of the boys. On one of these occasions, General Hartsuff riding by, got off his horse and requested permission to catch behind the bat, informing us there was nothing he enjoyed so much. He gave it up after a few minutes and rode away, having made a very pleasant impression."

Davis also mentions a game of ball being played in April 1863 as large numbers of troops were awaiting a formal review by President Lincoln and Secretary of War Stanton near the Potomac River, "to the no small amusement of the lookers-on" [page 198]. In November 1863, still in Virginia, Davis reports that while awaiting an order to attack a nearby Confederate force, "Time dragged along, and no movement was made. We were all tired of the inaction and the heavy strain on the mind from hours of expectation, and so we had a game of ball to pass away the time. Occasionally the ball would be batted over the crest of the hill in front, in range of the rebel skirmishers, necessitating some one going after it. It was a risky piece of business and required quick work, but it was got every time." [page 288.]

In March 1864, the 13th played the 104th NY and won 62-20. "As opportunities for indulging our love for this pastime were not very frequent, we got a deal of pleasure out of it." [page 309.] Later that month, the regiment celebrated the escape and return the colonel of the 16th Maine with base-ball, along with chasing greased pigs and a sack race. [Page 313.] 

Sources:

Charles E. Davis, Jr., Three Years in the Army: The Story of the Thirteenth Massachusetts Volunteers (Estes and Lauriat, Boston MA, 1894), page 56. The full text was accessed on 6/1/09 on Google books via a search for "'Charles E. Davis' three". PBall file: CW20.

Also cited in Kirsch, Baseball in Blue and Gray (Princeton U, 2003), page 41.  

Comment:

The first entry is dated May 6, 1862, when the regiment was in the vicinity of Warrenton VA. There is no further detail on the version of base ball that was played. 

 

Year
1862
Item
1862.16
Edit

1862.17 Ballplaying Frequently Played at Salisbury Prison in North Carolina

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Beginning in 1862, prisoners' diary accounts refer to a number of base ball games [by New York rules; Millen infers that games occurred "almost daily"] at Salisbury prison in NC. Charles Gray, a Union doctor who arrived at Salisbury in May 1862, reported ball playing "for those who like it and are able." RI soldier William Crossley in March 1863 described a "great game of baseball" between prisoners transferred from New Orleans and Tuscaloosa AL.

[A] In an unattributed and undated passage, Josephus Clarkson, a prisoner from Boston "recalled in his diary that one of the Union solders wandered over and picked up a pine branch that had dropped on the ground. Another soldier wrapped a stone in a couple of woolen socks and tied the bundle with a string. The soldiers started a baseball game of sorts, although there was much argument over whether to use Town Ball rules or play like New Yorkers. 'To put a man out by Town Ball rules you could plug him as he ran,' wrote Clarkson. 'Since many of the men were in a weakened condition, it was agreed to play the faster but less harsh New York rules, which intrigued our guards. The game of baseball had been played much in the South, but many of them [the guards] had never seen the sport devised by Mr. Cartwright. Eventually they found proper bats for us to play with and we fashioned a ball that was soft and a great bounders.'" According to Clarkson, a pitcher from Texas was banished from playing in a guards/captives game after "badly laming" several prisoners. "By and large," he said, "baseball was quite a popular pastime of troops on both sides, as a means of relaxing before and after battles."

[B] Otto Boetticher, a commercial artist before the war, was imprisoned at Salisbury for part of 1862 and drew a picture of a ball game in progress at the prison that was published in color in 1863. A fine reproduction appears in Ward and Burns.

[C] Adolphus Magnum, A visiting Confederate chaplain, noted in 1862 that "a number of the younger and less dignified [Union officers] ran like schoolboys to the playing ground and were soon joining In high glee in a game of ball."

[D] An extended account of ballplaying at Salisbury, along with the Boetticher drawing, are found in From Pastime to Passion. It draws heavily on Jim Sumner, "Baseball at Salisbury Prison Camp," Baseball History (Meckler, Westport CT, 1989). Similar but unattributed coverage is found in Kirsch, Baseball in Blue and Gray (Princeton U, 2003), pp 43-45. PBall file: CW21.

Sources:

[A] Wells Twombley, 200 Years of Sport in America (McGraw-Hill, 1976), page 71.

[B] Ward and Burns, Baseball Illustrated, at pages 10-11.

[C] Magnum.

[D] Patricia Millen, From Pastime to Passion: Baseball and the Civil War (Heritage Books, 2001), pp.27-31.

[E] Patricia Millen, "The POW Game-- Captive Union Soldiers Play a Baseball Game at Salisbury, NC", in Inventing Baseball: The 100 Greatest Games of the 19th Century (SABR, 2013), pp. 36-38

 

 

 

 

Warning:

It would be desirable to locate and inspect the Josephus Clarkson diary used in Twombley [A, above.]. Clarkson, described as a ship's chandler before the war, does not yield to Google or Genealogy bank as of 6/6/2009 or 4/3/2013.  John Thorn's repeated searches have also come up empty.  Particularly questionable is Clarkson's very early identification of Cartwright as an originator of the NY game.

Year
1862
Item
1862.17
Edit

1862.18 Impact of War Lessens in NYC

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] "BALL PLAYERS OFF TO THE WAR.-- But few of the fraternity, in comparison with the number who left in May, 1861, have gone off to the war this time in the militia regiments...All the clubs have their representatives in the several regiments...but the hegira of warlike ball-players is nothing near as great as in 1861, the necessity not being as pressing..."

[B] "Base Ball. The return of the 47th and 13th regiments has given quite an impetus to ball playing, and the vigor and energy that characterizes the ball player are again displaying themselves in the various clubs."

[C] "BASE BALL. THE BALTIC BASE BALL CLUB OF NEW YORK. It is really a pleasure to welcome the 'Old Baltics' again to the base ball field. At the commencement of the rebellion a great many of the most active and prominent members of this club, patriotically enlisted under and fought for the 'old flag;' this was the main cause of the club's temporary disbandment..."

Sources:

[A] New York Sunday Mercury, June 1, 1862

[B] Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Sep. 9, 1862

[C] Wilkes' Spirit of the Times, Nov. 29, 1862

 

Comment:

In an editorial printed on Aug. 9, 1862 Fitzgerald's City Item, of Philadelphia listed arguments for continuing base ball during the war.

Year
1862
Item
1862.18
Edit

1862.19 The 39th Massachusetts Plays Ball

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

The regimental history of the 39th MA has two passing references to ballplaying. On Thanksgiving Day of 1862, "There was a release from the greater part of camp duties and the time thus secured was devoted to baseball, football and other diversions so easily devised by the American youth" [p. 50]. The regimental camp was in southern MD, within 15 miles of Washington. April 2, 1863 "was the regular New England Fast Day, and a holiday was proclaimed by the Colonel . . . . [T]here was no failure in taking part in the races, sparring-matches, and various games, of at least witnessing them. The baseball game was between the men of Sleeper's Battery and those selected from the 39th with the honors remaining with the Infantry, though the cannoneers were supposed to be particularly skillful in the throwing of balls." [page 64]. The regiment was now in Poolesville MD, about 30 miles NW of Washington.

 

Sources:

Alfred S. Roe, The Thirty-Ninth Regiment. Massachusetts Volunteers 1862-1865 (Regimental Veteran Association, Worcester, 1914). Accessed 6/3/09 on Google Books via "'thirty-ninth' roe" search.  PBall file: CW-26.

Comment:

The regiment was drawn from the general Boston area.

Year
1862
Item
1862.19
Edit

1862.20 Wisconsin Man's Diary Included a Dozen References to Ballplaying

Location:

Wisconsin

Game:

Wicket

Age of Players:

Adult

Private Jenkin Jones sprinkled 12 references to ballplaying in his Civil War Diary. They range from December 1862 to February 1865. Most are very brief notes, like the "played ball in the afternoon" he recorded in Memphis in February 1863 [page 34]. The more revealing entries:

· Oxford, 12/62: "The delightful weather succeeded in enticing most of the boys form their well-worn decks and cribbage boards, bringing them out in ball playing, pitching quoits,etc. Tallied for an interesting game of base ball" [pp 19/20]

· Huntsville, 3/64: "Games daily in camp, ball, etc." [p. 184]

· Huntsville, 3/64: "Played ball all of the afternoon" [p.193]

· Fort Hall, 4/64: "[Col. Raum] examined our quarters and fortifications, after which he and the other officers turned in that had a game of wicket ball." [p.203]

· Etowah Bridge, 9/64: "a championship game of base-ball was played on the flat between the non-veterans and the veterans. The non-veterans came off victorious by 11 points in 61." [p. 251]

· Chattanooga, 2/65: "The 6th Badger boys have been playing ball with our neighbors, Buckeyes, this afternoon. We beat them three games of four.

 

Sources:

Jenkin Lloyd Jones, An Artilleryman's Diary (Wisconsin History Commission, 1914). Accessed on Google Books 6/3/09 via "'wisconsin history commission' 'No. 8'" search. PBall file: CW-28.

Comment:

Jones was from Spring Green, WI, which is about 30 miles west of Madison and 110 miles west of Milwaukee WI. Jones later became a leading Unitarian minister and a pacifist. 

Year
1862
Item
1862.20
Edit

1862.21 Michigan Colonel Plays Ball in Tennessee, Still Rebuffs Rebs

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

The 12th Michigan Regiment had the task in December 1862 of guarding a supply railroad in Tennessee. On December 24, a detachment under Col. Wm. Graves was surrounded by a large rebel force that approached under white flag, demanding surrender. Graves' account: "The officer asked, 'Who is in command?' I answered, 'I am;' whereupon he surveyed me from head to foot (I had been playing ball that morning, pants in boots, having a jacket without straps) . . . ." Graves refused, a two-hour fight ensued, and the rebels retreated.

 

Sources:

J. Robertson, compiler, Michigan in the War (W. S. George, Lansing MI, 1882), page 327. Accessed 6/4/09 on Google Books via ""michigan in the war" search. PBall file: CW-29.

Comment:

The regiment seems to have been drawn from the vicinity of Niles, MI, which is 10 miles north of South Bend IN and 60 miles east of Chicago.. The 1862 engagement occurred at Middleburg TN, which is at about the midpoint between Nashville and Memphis. 

Year
1862
Item
1862.21
Edit

1862.22 Crowd of 40,000 Said to Watch Christmas Day Game on SC Coast

Game:

Base Ball

"In Hilton Head, South Carolina, on Christmas Day in 1862, recalled Colonel A. G. Mills in 1923, his regiment, the 165th New York Infantry, Second Duryea's Zouaves, [engaged a?] picked nine from the other New York regiments in that vicinity.' Supposedly, the game was cheered on by a congregation of 40,000!" Mills eventually served as President of the National League and chair of the Mills Commission on the origins of baseball.

 

Sources:

Patricia Millen, From Pastime to Passion: Baseball and the Civil War (Heritage Books, 2001), pp 21-22. Millen cites A. G. Mills, "The Evening World's Baseball Panorama." Mills Papers, Giamatti Center, Baseball HOF. The account also appears in A. Spalding, Americas' National Game (American Sports Publishing, 1911), pp 95.96.  PBall file -- CW-30

Query:

Is this crowd estimate reasonable? Are other contemporary or reflective accounts available?

The crowd estimate is exaggerated. There weren't anywhere near 40,000 troops on the island at that time. [ba]

Year
1862
Item
1862.22
Edit

1862.23 Soldiers' Christmas in Virginia - Ballplaying "on Many a Hillside"

Tags:

Civil War

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

A correspondent near Fredericksburg VA told Philadelphia readers about "orders from head-quarters that Christmas day should be observed as a day or recreation. The men gladly availed themselves of this privilege, and on many a hill-side might be seen parties playing at ball, or busy at work dragging Christmas-trees to the quarters . . . ."

The article also reported that "Brown cricket jackets are now issued to the men instead of the brown blouses formerly issued. These jackets make a very comfortable garment . . . but they are very unmilitary-looking." 

Sources:

"Christmas in the Army," Philadelphia Inquirer, December 29, 1862. Accessed via Genealogybank, 5/21/09.  PBall file CW-31.

Query:

was a PA regiment involved?

Year
1862
Item
1862.23
Edit

1862.24 Ball Game Photographed at Fort Pulaski, Georgia

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

A ball game appears in the background of photographs of the 48th New York at Fort Pulaski. The Fort, near the Georgia coast, had been taken by the North in July 1862. The National Park Services dates its image to 1862.

Sources:

One shot appears in Kirsch, Baseball in Blue and Gray, page 32, and another, apparently, at the NPS site http://www.nps.gov/fopu/historyculture/baseball.htm [accessed 6/6/09.] PBall file: CW-33.

Comment:

we welcome your interpretation of these photos.

The 48th NY was from NYC, and thus likely had members familiar with the game. [ba]

Year
1862
Item
1862.24
Edit

1862.25 Hitting Creighton: Patience Pays

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"The question will naturally be asked, how came the Unions to score so well against Creighton's pitching? and the reply is, that they waited until they got a ball to suit them, Creighton delivering, on an average, 20 or 30 balls to each striker in four of the six innings played."

Sources:

New York Sunday Mercury, Aug. 2, 1862

Comment:

The report goes on to disclose the secrets of Creighton's success as a pitcher. The Union of Morrisania club had defeated Creighton and the Excelsior of South Brooklyn, 12-4.

Year
1862
Item
1862.25
Edit

1862.57 Games Between NY and MA Regiments Punctuated by Artillery

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Notables:

Union General George McClellan

Members of the Massachusetts 22nd Regiment and the NY 14th squared off for two matches on April 15, 1862, in the vicinity of active fire, and "in sight of the enemy’s breastworks mounted with heavy 64’s and 32’s."  A discarded boot supplied material for a new cover for the game ball.  Union General McClellan passed by while play was in progress.

Additional details are provided in the supplemental text, below.

Sources:

Rochester Union and Advertiser, April 24, 1862.

Query:

 

 

Year
1862
Item
1862.57
Edit
Source Text

1862.60 Confederate POWs play baseball in New York City

Tags:

Civil War

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

May 9, 1862: "This morning we received balls and bats from New York and have organized a regular Base Ball Club. We have been playing considerable today and I feel quite fine in consequence."

"A Confederate Yankee: The Journal of Edward William Drummond,a Confederate Soldier from Maine" (Drummond and Roger S. Durham), p. 51.

Drummond, along with his Savannah "Chatham Artillery" unit, were captured at Fort Pulaski, outside Savanna, and taken to Governors Island POW camp in New York harbor. The next month he and his comrades play baseball almost daily. 

Drummond was a Maine-born bookkeeper in Savannah at the start of the war. This entry suggests that his fellow townsmen were perfectly familiar with the game of base ball.

Sources:

"A Confederate Yankee: The Journal of Edward William Drummond,a Confederate Soldier from Maine" (Drummond and Roger S. Durham), p. 51.

 

Year
1862
Item
1862.60
Edit

1862.61 Confederate POWs in Indianapolis play base ball

Tags:

Civil War

Location:

United States

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Confederate army POWs at Camp Morton, Indianapolis, played baseball in 1862, according to  a letter from a POW, and a report by a Union general. See James R. Hall, "Den of Misery. Indiana's Civil War Prison" p. 39, 71.

Camp Morton was situated on the old state fairgrounds, and was used as a baseball field postwar.

Sources:

James R. Hall, "Den of Misery. Indiana's Civil War Prison" p. 39, 71.

Year
1862
Item
1862.61
Edit

1863.1 Ballplaying Peaks in the Civil War Camps

Location:

VA

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] "[In April 1863] the Third Corps and the Sixth Corps baseball teams met near White Oak Church, Virginia, to play for the championship of the Army of the Potomac."

[B] "Ballplaying in the Civil War Camps increased rapidly during the War, reaching a peak of 82 known games in April 1863 -- while the troops still remained in their winter camps.  Base ball was by a large margin the game of choice among soldiers, but wicket, cricket, and the Massachusetts game were occasionally played.  Play was much more common in the winter camps than near the battle fronts."

[C] Note: In August 2013 Civil War scholar Bruce Allardice added this context to the recollected Army-wide "championship game":

"The pitcher for the winning team was Lt. James Alexander Linen (1840-1918) of the 26th NJ, formerly of the Newark Eureka BBC. Linen later headed the bank, hence the mention in the book. In 1865 Linen organized the Wyoming BBC of Scranton, which changed its name to the Scranton BBC the next year. The 26th NJ was a Newark outfit, and a contemporary Newark newspaper says that many members of the prewar Eurekas and Adriatics of that town had joined the 26th. The 26th was in the Sixth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, stationed at/near White Oak Church near Fredericksburg, VA. April 1863, the army was in camp.  The book says Linen played against Charlie Walker a former catcher of the Newark Adriatics who was now catcher for the "Third Corps" club.

"With all that being said, in my opinion the clubs that played this game weren't 'corps' clubs, but rather regimental and/or brigade clubs that by their play against other regiments/brigades claimed the Third and Sixth Corps championships.

"Steinke's "Scranton", page 44, has a line drawing and long article on Linen which mentions this game. See also the "New York Clipper" website, which has a photo of Linen."

Sources:

[A] History.  The First National Bank of Scranton, PA (Scranton, 1906), page 37.  This is, at this time (2011),  the only known reference to championship games in the warring armies.

As described in Patricia Millen, On the Battlefield, the New York Game Takes Hold, 1861-1865, Base Ball Journal, Volume 5, number 1 (Special Issue on Origins), pages 149-152.

[B] Larry McCray, Ballplaying in Civil War Camps.

[C]  Bruce Allardice, email to Protoball of August, 2013.

[D] (((add Steinke ref and Clipper url here?)))

 

 

Warning:

Note Civil War historian Bruce Allardice's caveat, above:  "In my opinion the clubs that played weren't 'corps' clubs, but rather regimental or brigade clubs that by their play other regiments/brigades claimed the Third and Sixth Corps championships."

Query:

Is it possible that a collection of trophy balls, at the Hall of Fame or elsewhere, would provide more evidence of the prevalence of base ball in the Civil War?

Year
1863
Item
1863.1
Edit

1863.56 Have Fast Ball Will Travel

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] THE ATHLETIC CLUB OF PHILADELPHIA.--...Pratt, the well-known pitcher of the club...has been desirous for some time past of belonging to one of our leading clubs here; and during the visit of the Athletics to New York, Pratt being offered a good situation here, accepted it, and at once had his name proposed as a member of the Atlantic Club...Of course, he will henceforth be their pitcher...His accession to the Atlantic nine will strengthen them in what they have considered their weak point...We presume that the Atlantics will not play their match with the Eckfords until they can get Pratt in their nine..."

[B] "THE ATHLETIC CLUB OF PHILADELPHIA.-- A great change has suddenly occurred in the formation of the first nine of the Athletic club of Philadelphia. Pratt, their able pitcher, resigned from the club the day of his arrival in Philadelphia, the reason he assigned being that he had been offered a good situation in New York, and had joined the Atlantic club of Brooklyn, and henceforth he was to be the pitcher of that noted club, an honor no doubt that he was exceeding ambitious of obtaining."

Sources:

[A] New York Sunday Mercury, July 12, 1863

[B] New York Clipper, July 18, 1863

Comment:

Tom Pratt was age 19.

Year
1863
Item
1863.56
Edit

1863.62 The Times Calls a Spade a Spade-- Base Ball is Obliterating Cricket

Age of Players:

Adult

...cricket has been almost obliterated by base ball, which, but ten years since, was in its infancy...The main cause of this is, that a few cricketers...play pretty much all the matches for the few Clubs that exist only in name; while Bass Ball Clubs play their matches with their bona fide members, and consequently their medium players always have a prospect before them of being chosen to play..."

Sources:

New York Times, Sep. 25, 1863

Year
1863
Item
1863.62
Edit

1863.63 NABBP Curbs Swift Pitching, Swats Fly Rule Again

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

The (NABBP) meeting of December 9 (1863) adopted all recommendations made by the Rules Committee. Though the suggestion of counting wild pitches as runs was not approved, three measures were taken to curb fast, wild pitching: a back line was added to the pitcher’s position, ending the practice of taking a run-up to increase speed, as in cricket; pitchers were required to have both feet on the ground at the time of delivery; and, finally, walks...:

"Should a pitcher repeatedly fail to deliver fair balls to the striker, for the apparent purpose of delaying the game, or for any other cause, the umpire after warning him, shall call one ball, and if the pitcher persists in such action, two and three balls, and when three balls have been called, the striker shall be entitled to his first base, and should any base be occupied at that time each player occupying them shall be entitled to one base.

The exception to the meeting’s unanimous acceptance of the Rules Committee’s action concerned the fly game, which, as with all previous attempts, was rejected, by a vote of 25 to 22. 

Sources:

Robert Tholkes, "A Permanent American Institution: The Base Ball Season of 1863", in Base Ball: A Journal of the Early Game, Vol.7 (2013), pp. 143-153

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Dec. 10, 1863

Year
1863
Item
1863.63
Edit

1863.65 Ravaged By War

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

The Sunday Mercury, in its summary of the (NABBP)  meeting on December 13, 1863, first noted that the disappointing attendance (28 clubs, compared to 32 in 1862)...The convention’s action in dropping 29 clubs, one more than attended the meeting, from the rolls because of inactivity in 1862 and 1863 indicated the scope of the war’s impact...In addition to diminished activity in New York City, Brooklyn, Boston, and Philadelphia, the widespread formation of clubs and beginning of match play in the west and in some southern states before the war came to a halt in most locales. The contributors to Base Ball Pioneers 1850-1870 (Morris et al, eds.,2012) found interclub play on a regular basis continuing in 1863 only in upstate New York and in Michigan’s Lower Peninsula, including its inauguration that year at the University of Michigan. Other places, such as Baltimore, Washington, D. C., Altoona and Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, Chicago and Freeport, Illinois, St. Louis, and perhaps San Francisco) retained single clubs that relied on rare intercity visits for interclub competition. In a far greater number of locales, from Minnesota to Louisiana and from Maine to Augusta and Macon, Georgia, organized play apparently ceased. 

Sources:

Robert Tholkes, "A Permanent American Institution: The Base Ball Season of 1863", in Base Ball: A Journal of the Early Game, Vol. 7 (2013), pp. 143-153

Year
1863
Item
1863.65
Edit

1863.66 They didn't know the rules!

Tags:

Civil War

Location:

Youngs Point

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

The members of the Chicago Light Artillery (Taylor's Battery) played baseball at the army's base at Young's Point, LA (across the Mississippi River from Vicksburg), in April of 1863. According to soldier Israel P. Rumsey, the soldiers broke out their balls and bats and "played Base Ball according to the rule for the first time" even though nobody could agree on exactly what the rules were! Rumsey's diary is quoted in Bjorn Skaptasan, "The Chicago Light Artillery at Vicksburg," Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Autumn/Winter 2013, p. 422-462 at 438

Sources:

Bjorn Skaptasan, "The Chicago Light Artillery at Vicksburg," Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Autumn/Winter 2013, p. 422-462 at 438

Year
1863
Item
1863.66
Edit

1863.69 19th IL vs. 69th Ohio

Tags:

Civil War

Location:

Murfreesboro, TN

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

In May of 1863 the Turchin Boys of the 19th Illinois (Basil Turchin was colonel of the 19th) played a team from the 69th Ohio, on the drill ground just outside the Union army camp at Murfreesboro, TN. 

This Turchin team played a wartime game in Chicago (see protoball entry).

Sources:

Cincinnati Inquirer, Feb. 25, 1879

Year
1863
Item
1863.69
Edit

1863.70 10th Vermont loves its Baseball

Tags:

Civil War

Age of Players:

Adult

The Vermont Watchman, April 3, 1863, prints a letter from the 10th Vermont Infantry Regiment, camped at Conrad's Ferry, MD, stating that now the ground is drying up from winter, "base ball has come into vogue."

Year
1863
Item
1863.70
Edit

1864.35 Government Promotes Base Ball

Location:

US

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"GOVERNMENT BALL GROUNDS.-- The game of base ball has lately received such an endorement (sic) at the hands of the U. S. government as will go far toward giving it permanency as the national game of ball in America. Not only have base ball matches been encouraged by the military authorities, at the various army stations, as a means of recreation, as a means of recreation and exercise for the soldiers, in hours of relaxation from active service...but the naval authorities have recently made arrangements by which our sailors can similarly enjoy a pleasureable sport and healthy exercise at the same time...Ball players are being made by the hundred i our army. The few members of clubs who happen to get into the different regiments that have emanated from the Metropolis have inoculated the whole service with the love of the game, and during last year, for the first time, we believe, that base ball matches took place in every State in the Union-- or out of it, as the case may be--this side of the Mississippi."

Sources:

Brooklyn Daily Eagle,  March 30, 1864

Year
1864
Item
1864.35
Edit

1864.37 Buzz For Fly Game Begins

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Sources:

[A] New York Sunday Mercury, May 15, 1864

[B] New York Sunday Mercury, Nov. 13, 1864

[C] New York Clipper, Nov. 19, 1864

[D] New York Sunday Mercury, Dec. 4, 1864

[E] New York Sunday Mercury, Dec. 11, 1864

Comment:

The NABBP meeting of Dec. 14, 1864, adopted the fly game.

Year
1864
Item
1864.37
Edit

1864.38 Base Ball On The Rebound

Tags:

Civil War

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Youth, Adult

[A] "THE SEASON OF 1864...The prospects for a successful season for 1864 are more favorable than those of any season since 1861..."

[B] "THE OPENING PLAY OF THE SEASON. NOT since 1861 has there been a season that has opened more auspiciously for the welfare of the game than the present one; and the prospects are that we shall have one of the most enjoyable series of matches of any year since base ball was inaugurated as our national game of ball."

[C] 'THE JUNIOR FRATERNITY.-- Not a week passes that some new junior organization does not spring into existence..."

[D] "MATCHES FOR SEPTEMBER.-- ...We are glad to note the fact that not even in the palmy days of 1860, when every vacant lot or available space for playing ball was occupied by junior clubs, have these young players been so numerous as this season."

[E] "THE SEASON OF 1864.-- Taking into consideration the existence of civil war in the country, the ball-playing season of 1864 has been the most successful and advantageous to the interests of our national game known in the annals of baseball...We are glad also to record the fact, that among the marked features of the past season none has been more promising for the permanence of the game than the great increase of junior players and clubs."

Sources:

[A] New York Clipper, April 16, 1864

[B] New York Clipper, May 14, 1864

[C] Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Aug. 22, 1864

[D] Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Sep. 9, 1864

[E] New York Sunday Mercury, Nov. 13, 1864

Year
1864
Item
1864.38
Edit

1864.40 Signals for Throwing to Base

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"THE SIXTH RULE OF THE GAME...all pitchers should follow the example of the Excelsior players in 1860. The pitcher and catcher of the Excelsiors had regular signals whereby the pitcher knew when to throw to the bases. This is the only right plan to pursue in playing this point of the game."

Sources:

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, July 13, 1864

Year
1864
Item
1864.40
Edit

1864.41 Legal Pitching Deliveries

Location:

NY State

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"Base Ball in Albany...The Mutual Club had a fine time in Utica...although the Utica nine had a pitcher who "bowled" the ball to the bat, he being a cricketer...by the way, bowling is fair, provided full pitched balls be sent in, as it is neither a jerk nor a throw, and what is neither one nor the other is fair pitching, according to the rules."

Sources:

Brooklyn Daily eagle, Sept. 2, 1864

Year
1864
Item
1864.41
Edit

1864.42 Is THIS How Bunting Started?

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"EXCELSIOR VS. ENTERPRISE.-- The "muffins" of these clubs played their return game yesterday on the Excelsior grounds...The feature of the play was the batting of Prof. Bassler of the Enterprise team...Being an original of the first water, he adopted an original theory in reference to batting, which we are obliged to confess is not of the most striking character. His idea is not a bad one though, it being to hit the ball slightly so as to have it drop near the home base, therefore necessitating the employment of considerable skill on the part of the pitcher to get at the ball, pick it up and throw it accurately to first base."

Sources:

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Sept. 16, 1864

Year
1864
Item
1864.42
Edit

1864.43 Like It or Lump It, Gents

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] "ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS.-- ...If any club is dissatisfied with our reports of their games, let them personally inform us of the fact; not go to our employers to revenge any fancied injury or trying to injure us. The base ball clubs must either take our reports as we give them, in our endeavor to do impartial justice to all, or they will not have a line of notice emanating from our pen...the next time the club our correspondent refers to see their name written by us in any paper with which we are connected, it will be when they behave to us like other clubs...we do not harbor ill will towards a solitary member of the Atlantic club...but there is a principle involved...it being the right of a reporter of base ball matches to fairly criticise the actions of players..."

[B] "ATLANTIC VS. GOTHAM.-- ...Our reporter will give a full account of the proceedings, as the satisfactory explanations made to him by the Secretary of the Club on Friday, have, as far as he is concerned, entirely restored the friendly relations which had previously been interrupted."

Sources:

[A] Brooklyn Daily Eagle, August 29, 1864

[B] Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Sept. 17, 1864

 

Year
1864
Item
1864.43
Edit

1864.44 Canadian Baseball Association Forms

Location:

Canada

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"BASE-BALL IN CANADA. A meeting of delegates appointed to form a Base-Ball Association in Canada was held in the town of Woodstock on Monday evening, 15th August, 1864."

Sources:

Wilkes' Spirit of the Times, Sept. 10, 1864

Comment:

Four clubs, all in Ontario, were represented-- the Young Canadian Club (Woodstock); Maple Leaf Club (Hamilton); Barton Club (Barton); and Victoria Club (Ingersoll)

Year
1864
Item
1864.44
Edit

1864.45 Playing for Prizes

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"ECKFORD vs. MUTUAL-- AN INTERESTING GAME. -- These clubs played their return match together on the Union ballgrounds, Brooklyn, on Monday last...considerable interest being taken in the match, from the fact that it was the last of the season in which the Mutual first-nine would be engaged, and also that the Mutuals had offered a series of prizes to their players, amounting to one hundred dollars, as an incentive to extra exertions."

Sources:

New York Sunday Mercury, Oct. 16, 1864

Year
1864
Item
1864.45
Edit

1864.47 "Union" Games Started 1864 Season

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] "...These practice games are simply nothing more or less than substitutes for the useless and uninteresting ordinarily played on practice days by our first-class clubs. It has been suggested, time and again...that they devote one day in a week...to practicing their men together as a whole against the field; but as yet, not a solitary club has ever practiced their best players together in this way...It is this neglect on the part of or clubs, to improve the character of the practice games on their club grounds, that has led to the arrangement of these Union Practice Games.”

[B] “THE GRAND PRIZE-MATCH IN BROOKLYN. The prize-game of the series of Union practice-games inaugurated by Mr. Chadwick, which took place on Saturday, May 21st...proved to be a complete success in every respect, and one of the best-played and most interesting games seen for several seasons past...(it) afforded those present proof of the advantage of such a class of games...”

[C] “THE SECOND PRIZE-GAME IN BROOKLYN.—...the Atlantics refused to play according to the rules of these series of games...They also seemed to regard the match as one on which their standing as a playing-club was concerned, rather than...one of a series of games designed to test the merits of the flygame.”

[D] "The Eckford was defeated by the field at the so-called prize game, and the Atlantic won the game with the field. The prize game, so far as it interferes with the rules of the Convention, should be frowned down by all clubs, as it was repudiated by the Atlantic and Enterprise clubs.”

 

Sources:

[A] Brooklyn Daily Eagle, May 21, 1864

[B] Wilkes' Spirit of the Times, May 28, 1864

[C] New York Sunday Mercury, June 5, 1864

[D] New York Evening Express, June 13, 1864

Comment:

See Supplemental Text for further newspaper coverage.

Year
1864
Item
1864.47
Edit
Source Text

1864.48 NABBP Hobbles Pitchers

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] “THE NEW RULES.—...’Section 5. Should the pitcher repeatedly fail to deliver to the striker fair balls, for the apparent purpose of delaying the game, or for any other cause, the umpire, after warning him, shall call one ball, and if the pitcher persists in such action, two and three balls; when three balls shall have been called, the striker shall be entitled to the first base, and should any base be occupied at that time, each player occupying them shall be entitled to one base. Section 6. The pitcher’s position shall be designated by two lines, four yards in length, drawn at right angles to a line from home to second base, having their centres upon that line at two fixed iron plates, placed at points fifteen and sixteen yards distant from the home-base, and for the striker...Section 7...whenever the pitcher draws back his hand, or moves with the apparent purpose or pretention to deliver the ball, he shall so deliver it, and must have neither foot in advance of the line of his position or off the ground at the time of delivering the ball; and if he fails in either of these particulars then it shall be declared a balk.’” 

[B] 

—“THE NEW RULES—adopted by the last Convention, promise to work out a desirable reform. The Pitcher can no longer push a game into the dark, by the old style of baby-play, but is ‘compelled’ to deliver balls to the Striker, or else a base is given. And then again, instead of taking a wide range, in which to swing a bill and move the feet, he must keep within his circumscribed limit, and deliver a fair ball.”

Sources:

[A] New York Sunday Mercury, March 27, 1864

[B] New York Evening Express, April 22, 1864

Comment:

For various reasons, umpires enforced the new rules only inconsistently. See Supplemental Text.

Year
1864
Item
1864.48
Edit
Source Text

1864.50 Dime for Admission, Two Dimes for Carriages

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"THE REGULATIONS OF THE CAPITOLINE BALL GROUNDS...Rule  1st,-- The admission to the Ball ground shall be as follows: for a single person ten cents, for a carriage twenty cents, its occupants of course being charged additional."

Sources:

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, April 16, 1864

Comment:

The Capitoline Grounds were just opening, and were the second closed grounds; see 1862.9 for the Union Grounds, also in Brooklyn.

Year
1864
Item
1864.50
Edit

1864.53 General Hooker's Players "Pretty Badly Beat", 70-11

Tags:

Civil War

Age of Players:

Adult

A: The match game of base ball between the staff, and orderlies of Gen. Hooker, and thirteen players from our regiment came off this forenoon, the result was in favor of our regiment, the innings stood seventy to eleven, pretty badly beat wasn't they.  They will play another game this afternoon.  Gen. Hooker ordered Col. Wood to postpone brigade drill, that they might play.

 

B:Nothing has been stirring for the last week except for ball playing and one brigade drill.  We play ball about all the time now.  We, or some of the officers, have received a challenge from Gen'l Hooker's staff and escort to play a match.  Fourteen players have been selected to play against them, amongst whom is ELE< the letter writer>.  Four of them are commissioned officers, the rest enlisted men.  We have also had a challenge from the one hundred and thirty.sixth New York, bit I don't know if it will be played or not.

 

C: Major Lawrence with a skillful nine selected from Hooker's body guard, challenged the [33rd MA] regiment to match them in a manly game of base ball, and his nine got worsted.  The New York regiment threw down the glove with a like result.  The champion Sharon [MA] boys knew a thing or two about base ball, which they had learned in contests with the laurelled Massapoags at home. 

Sources:

A: Letter of April 13, 1864 by Lt. Thomas Howland.  Obtained via Massachusetts Historical Society, August 2015.

B: Letter home by E. L. Edes, April 1864. For full letter, see Supplemental Text, below.

C: A. B. Underwood, Thirty-Third Mass. Infantry Regiment, 1862 - 1865 (A. Williams and Co., Boston, 1881, page 199.  Search string: <kershaw had a smart>. 

 

Comment:

It seems likely that these games were played under Mass game rules.

General Sherman's winter camp was outside Chattanooga, and his march into GA started in the beginning of May 1864.

 

 

Query:

The Massapoag Club of Sharon MA fielded 10-14 players for its pre-war games, which were subject to Massachusetts rules.  Why would the regimental history, 17 years later, refer to "nines"? 

Year
1864
Item
1864.53
Edit
Source Text

1864.54 Daily Eagle Sees Base Ball Now Played Throughout US North (East of the Mississippi)

Age of Players:

Adult


"Ball players are being made by the hundred in our army. The few members of clubs that happen to get into the different regiments that have emanated from the Metropolis have inoculated the whole service with a love of the game, and during last year, for the first time, we believe, base ball matches took place in every State in the Union-- or out of it, as the case may be-- this side of the Mississippi. Materials are now furnished to the various regiments that require them, and this by order of the Government, and this year, unless some very stirring work is done, games of ball will be played throughout the country, not only by civilians in the great cities, but by our soldiers in every camp, North, East, West, and South."

Sources:

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, March 30, 1864

Comment:

In submitting this piece, Bob Tholkes writes: "In recent years the role of the Civil War in expanding baseball, once considered crucial, has suffered bombardment by several large-bore researchers. The Brooklyn Daily Eagle made the case for the influence of the war.  If the crucial nature of the war's role is a myth, it is a myth reaching back to the beginning."

Year
1864
Item
1864.54
Edit

1864.55 Soldiers on leave play ball in Chicago

Tags:

Civil War

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

The Chicago Tribune, June 28, 1864 reports that the Turchin Base Ball Club of the 19th Illinois Infantry will play a base ball game this afternoon at the Prairie Cricket grounds, West Madison St., Chicago. "All friends of the Nineteenth, and of this healthy and invigorating game, are expected to attend."

Basil Turchin was colonel and commander of the 19th.

Sources:

The Chicago Tribune, June 28, 1864

Year
1864
Item
1864.55
Edit

1864c.56 Confederate Prisoners Play Ball in Chicago

Tags:

Civil War

Location:

United States

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

At Camp Douglas, a prisoner of war camp in Chicago, the Confederate army prisoners played "the old-fashioned game of ball--with a ball and bats--but no base ball" (because to the prisoner, base ball meant you had to dress up in uniforms.

Copley, "A Sketch of the Battle of Franklin...." p. 172. He was taken prisoner in late 1864, thus the ballplaying he witnessed occurred in late 1864 or early 1865.

There are mentions in other books of POWs playing base ball at Camp Douglas.

For example, the Chicago Tribune, March 25, 1862 reports that the Camp Douglas POWs played " a game of ball.... giving full play to the arms, legs and lungs." Same Oct. 19, 1863 reports that the prisoners are playing base ball and quoits.

Sources:

Copley, "A Sketch of the Battle of Franklin...." p. 172

Circa
1864
Item
1864c.56
Edit

1864.57 Union Army Parolees Play Baseball in Camp

Tags:

Civil War

Location:

United States

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Cox, "Civil War Maryland" says Union army parolees played baseball in 1864 at Camp Parole, Annapolis, Maryland.

"Parole" was a system of POW exchange whereby the soldier, after surrender, took an oath not to serve again until properly exchanged, and was then released. Union parolees went to the parole camp near Annapolis that the Federal government established, to wait (in friendly territory) until notified that they'd been exchanged for a Confederate parolee. So this is another example of Union army POWs playing baseball.

Sources:

Cox, "Civil War Maryland"

Year
1864
Item
1864.57
Edit

1864.59 Union POWs Play Town Ball

Tags:

Civil War

Game:

Town Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

The Savannah Republican, Dec. 2, 1864 prints an item from the Canton MS Citizen of Nov. 11, says that Union soldiers captured at Athens, AL, while on parole and en route to Memphis for exchange, "played quite spiritedly in a game of old fashioned town ball" while in Canton.

Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest had captured the Union garrison at Athens shortly before this. "Parole" is a form of captivity where the POW gives his pledge not to escape, and will await a POW exchange.

Sources:

The Savannah Republican, Dec. 2, 1864

Year
1864
Item
1864.59
Edit

1865.8 First Integrated (Adult) Club Takes the Field?

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Luther B. Askin of Florence, MA (a hamlet of fewer than 1500 souls lying about 2 miles W of Northampton and about 90 miles W of Boston) is thought to be the first adult of African lineage to play on an integrated team in a standard match game.  The first baseman is listed in box-scores of the first 13 matches played by the Florence Eagles Club in 1865.

Sources:

Brian Turner, "America's Earliest Integrated Team?" National Pastime,Number 22 (2002), pages 81-90.

Brian Turner (email to Protoball, 2/1/2014), has supplementary data on early integrated play, and he reports that the 1865 game evidently remains the earliest known case of integrated adult play in a standard game.  

Comment:

Florence is recalled as one of the centers of Anti-Slavery activism in those times. The next earliest known instance of integration occurred in 1869 in Oberlin, OH, also a center of Anti-Slavery activism (see Ryczek, When Johnny Came Sliding Home, 1998, page 102).  Further instances of early integration might be found in communities that held similar views.

Brian notes in 2014 that juvenile clubs were apparently less unlikely to engage in integrated play, even prior to the Civil War. The son of Frederick Douglass, for instance, is known to have played on a white junior club in Rochester NY in 1859.  Luther Askin also played on such juvenile teams prior to the Civil War.

Query:

Have any earlier instances of integrated adult clubs arisen in recent years?

Year
1865
Item
1865.8
Edit

1865.10 New England Association Formed

Location:

MA

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] "...the fact is, the Massachusetts and Maine players are so far removed from New York, that they cannot conveniently participate in the meetings of the National Association, and therefore they purpose setting up a duplicate institution...They will, of course, indorse the rules of the National Association...At a meeting lately held at the rooms of the Tri-Mountain Club, the following resolutions were adopted...Resolved, That the Tri-Mountain Base ball Club us its utmost influence and endeavors to secure the formation and organization of a New England Convention of National Baseball Players." 

[B] "...A preliminary meeting of Delegates from those Clubs who propose joining the New England Convention of National Base Ball Players will be held on WEDNESDAY next, Oct. 25th, at 12 M., at the Hancock House, Court square, Boston...The following named Clubs have signified their intention of taking part...Tri-Mountain, of Boston, Fly-Away of East Boston, Harvard of Cambridge, Granite of Holliston, King Phillip of East Abingdon, Dictator of Newton, Continental of Newtonville."

[C] "N. E. CONVENTION OF BASE BALL CLUBS.-- A convention of delegates from the Dictator, Eureka, Electric, Fly-Away, Granite, Harvard, King Phillip, Lightfoot, Lowell, Orient, and Tri-Mountain Base Ball Clubs, was held at the Hancock House, yesterday...the association shall be called the New England Association of National Base Ball Clubs."

Sources:

[A] New York Sunday Mercury, Feb. 19, 1865

[B] Boston Herald, Oct. 21, 1865

[C] Boston Herald, Nov. 9, 1865

Year
1865
Item
1865.10
Edit

1865.12 "Professional" Players? Yes. Playing For Money? No

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] "THE MUTUAL CLUB AND THEIR GROUNDS. The Mutual Club...have rented the enitre ground (at the Elysian Fields)...their object being to afford equal opportunities for both the 'professional' and amateur players of the club to enjoy practice to their hearts' content."

[B] "PLAYING BASEBALL FOR MONEY.-- ...We trust never to see our national pastime brought down to the level of contests in the prize ring of pugilism. The honor of incasing the ball as the only trophy of victory in a match is sufficient without bringing pecuniary rewards into the game as incentives for extra efforts. When the time arrives for money to be made the object in playing ball, then good-bye to friendly contests and the rule of gentlemanly ball-players..."

Sources:

[A] New York Sunday Mercury, May 7, 1865

[B] New York Sunday Mercury, July 30, 1865

 

Year
1865
Item
1865.12
Edit

1865.13 Elysian? Yes. Sacred? No.

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"The old (Elysian Field baseball) grounds have lately been greatly improved. Trees have been cut down, rocks have been taken up, hollows filled up and hills levelled, and in fact everything has been done to make the field one of the finest ball grounds in the country. Permanent seats are to be placed on the boundary line set apart for spectators, and henceforth no difficulty will be experienced in keeping the crowd from interfering with the players around the catcher's and first and third base player's positions."

Sources:

New York Clipper, May 13, 1865

Year
1865
Item
1865.13
Edit

1865.15 Base Ball for the Haute Monde

Age of Players:

Adult

"Base Ball. EXCELSIOR OF BROOKLYN VS. KNICKERBOCKER OF NEW YORK. The Excelsior Club of Brooklyn, which in 1860 was the model club of the United States, and which, socially speaking, has but few equals now, had a friendly game with their old competitors of the veteran Knickerbocker Club, the Nestors of base ball, yesterday, at Hoboken, and a most enjoyable meeting it was. On this interesting occasion the busy denizens of Wall street, Exchange place, &c., threw aside their speculative ideas for the time being, and ignoring oil and gold stocks seek the green turf, and with bats and balls chase dull care away in brilliant style."

Sources:

New York Herald, July 8, 1865

Year
1865
Item
1865.15
Edit

1865.16 Boom in Base Ball Travel

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"Base Ball Clubs.-- The city (Philadelphia) will be visited by a number of ball clubs during fall...the Athletics themselves will visit Baltimore, Washington, Altoona, Princeton, and Salem...The clubs who will visit this city are mainly of New York. They will include the Mutuals, Eckfords, Actives, Unions, Empires, Eagles, Gothams, Excelsiors, Knickerbockers, Eurekas, hudson Rivers, Newark of Newark, Lowell of Boston, Enterprise and Pastimes of Baltimore, Mountain Club of Altoona, Alleghany of Pittsburg, Nassau of Princeton, &c."

Sources:

Philadelphia National American, reprinted in the New York Evening Post, July 17, 1865

Year
1865
Item
1865.16
Edit

1865.17 Mass Game Survived the Civil War

Tags:

Civil War

Age of Players:

Adult

"BASE BALL. A very interesting game (Massachusetts) was played on the 17th, between the Warren Club of Roxbury and the Lightfoot Clup of Neponset, on the grounds of the latter."

Sources:

Boston Herald, June 21, 1865

Year
1865
Item
1865.17
Edit

1865.19 The "Slide Game" Protested

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"You will appreciate my motive in calling the attention of first-class players of the game of Base-Ball, to a notorious custom practiced by players of the present day...The system of which I disapprove...is, that on the field we notice the 'slide game,' or when a player in an effort to gain his base will throw himself on the ground, feet foremost, sliding for fully a distance of twenty feet. It is not only the unmanliness of such a proceeding, but the danger encountered by a basekeeper from his opponent dashing at the base, feet first, convincing you that in the attempt to 'put him out' half a dozen steel spikes may enter your hands or body, hence the necessity of abolishing such an unfair practice, benefiting only the party in play, and angering or humiliating the base players. It is almost impossible to put a player out who is determined to enforce this manner of avoiding the ball, unless you are willing to risk the severe injury of your hands. It is not only an improper play, but destroys the spirit of the game."

Sources:

Anonymous reader communication in the Philadelphia Inquirer, June 24, 1865

Year
1865
Item
1865.19
Edit

1865.21 Fitz Credited With Originating Tournaments

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

“To the untiring exertions of Col. (Thomas) Fitzgerald, the worthy President of the Athletic, is due the inauguration of the ‘tournament’, which has awakened such a wide-spread interest in all parts of the country...” 

Sources:

Philadelphia Illustrated New Age, Nov. 1, 1865

Comment:

Few and far between in prior years, festivals or tournaments mushroomed in 1865, for example:

Portland, ME—at July 4 celebration. Open to all teams in ME, considered for state championship. 4 teams entered, knockout competition. 2 games at a time in the morning, championship game in the afternoon. 9 innings. Cash prizes for 1st and 2nd. Portland Daily Evening Advertiser coverage on July 6 indicated that the only out-of-town team was subject to “expressions of strong sympathy against them.”

Altoona, PA- per a reprint in Fitzgerald's City Item (Philadelphia) on 7/22, Altoona Tribune was promoting a baseball carnival—Athletics, Mountain Club of Altoona, and Alleghany Club of Pittsburg

Wash DC- Games on 8/28 between the Nationals and Athletics, 8/29 between the Nationals and the Atlantic of Brooklyn, “a festival such has never before been offered in Washington”. Washington Daily National Intelligencer, 8/28

Wash DC- Oct. 9-11 tourney had the Excelsior of Brooklyn, the Nationals, and the Enterprise of Baltimore. Round robin, one game per day. Wilkes Spirit of the Times, 10/21

Wilkes Spirit of the Times on Oct. 21 printed a letter from Chicago describing problems encountered at a tourney in Rockford, IL. 5 teams, two days, two games each day.

Year
1865
Item
1865.21
Edit

1865.23 NABBP Meeting Sets Attendance Record

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] "The ninth annual convention...proved to be most numerously attended...ever held...over ninety clubs were present."

[B] "...forty-eight clubs from New York State; fourteen from Pennsylvania; thirteen from New Jersey; four from Connecticut; four from Washington, D. C.; two from Massachusetts; and one each from Kansas, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Maine, making a grand total of 91 clubs represented..."

Sources:

[A] Brooklyn Daily Eagle, December 15, 1865

[B] New York Clipper, December 23, 1865

Year
1865
Item
1865.23
Edit

1865.24 Change Pitchers

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult


"Their nine [the Stars], however, needs two pitchers on it, no nine being
complete without a change pitcher."

Sources:

New York Clipper, June 10, 1865

Comment:

Earliest comment on need for more than one pitcher on a club. From a 19cbb post by Robert Schaefer, Nov. 9, 2003

Year
1865
Item
1865.24
Edit

1865.25 Three Mutuals Banned for "Heaving" Game to Eckfords for $100

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"On September 27, 1865, gambler Kane McLoughlin paid $100 collectively to three [Mutual] players to heave, in the favored term of the period, a game the following day to the Eckfords.  . . .  in the fifth inning the Mutuals amazingly allowed eleven runs to score through [what the NYTimes described as] 'over-pitched balls, wild throws, passed balls, and failures to stop them in the field.' "

The Mutuals obtained confessions and banned catcher Bill Wamsley and two others.  John Thorn cites this as base ball's first game-fixing incident.

Sources:

John Thorn, Baseball in the Garden of Eden (Simon and Schuster, 2011), page 127.  The book includes [pp. 128-129] the written confession of the youngest plotter, Tom Devyr, whom the Mutuals reinstated the following year. 

See also Philip Dixon, "The First Fixed Game-- Eckfords vs. Mutuals", in Inventing Baseball: The 100 Greatest Games of the 19th Century (SABR, 2013), pp.46-48.

Year
1865
Item
1865.25
Edit

1865.26 Otis MA Bests Lee MA at Wicket, 236 - 232

Game:

Wicket

Age of Players:

Adult

Lee, August 21, 1865

"To the Editor of the Pittsfield Sun: --

"The long-talked-of match game of wicket ball between the Otis and Lee Clubs, took place on Saturday last, resulting in a victory for the former.  The game was well-contests, booth sides manifesting extraordinary skill and zeal, and aside from  the one-sided decisions of  the Referee, nothing occurred to mar the harmony of the occasion. The following was the result:

"Lee. First Innings 78, Second Innings 80, Third Innings 74, Total 232.

"Otis. First Innings 73, Second Innings 79, Third Innings 84, Total 236.

"It appears that the Otis Club were allowed to furnish a Referee -- and they furnished one who was a resident of [nearby] Sandisfield.  In the minor details, when called upon to  decide a question, he was so manifestly unjust as to bring  forth showers of hisses from the spectators.

"The Lee Club have again challenged the Otis Club to play a match game for $50 and the suppers.  If the challenge is accepted, it is to be hoped that an impartial referee may be chosen, who will be acceptable to both Clubs."

 

 

Sources:

Pittsfield Sun, August 24, 1865, page 2.

Year
1865
Item
1865.26
Edit

1865.27 First Organized Base Ball Game in NC?

Tags:

Civil War

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

The New York Clipper, April 29, 1865 gives the box score of a game played near Goldsboro, NC on April 5th, between the drum corps and the privates of the 102nd NY Infantry, Sherman's Army, that had recently marched into NC.

Other than play at Salisbury POW camp, this might be the first organized base ball game ever played in the state.

Sources:

The New York Clipper, April 29, 1865

Year
1865
Item
1865.27
Edit

1865.28 Union Guards at Elmira Prison Play Baseball with Confederate POWs

Tags:

Civil War

Location:

United States

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Baseball play was part of the Elmira POW Camp throughout the war.

The Chemung Union played against some Elmira POWs in 1865, according to James E. Hare, "Elmira," p. 75.

Janowski, "The Elmira Prison Camp" p. 360 says that in 1864 "The teams of the different [Confederate] states used to play baseball for the edification of the guards," quoting  a soldier who was in the 54th NY guarding the POWs.

Horrigan, "Elmira: Death Camp of the North" says that on 9-3-64 two guards regiments, the 54th and 56th NY Infantry, played baseball against each other outside the camp.

Sources:

James E. Hare, "Elmira," p. 75

Year
1865
Item
1865.28
Edit

1865.29 Ballplaying at Appomattox surrender?

Tags:

Civil War

Location:

United States

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

There's long been a story that when Robert E. Lee's Confederate army surrendered at Appomattox, April 9, 1865, the Union victors played baseball games with the Confederate POWs. According to Pat Schroeder, who works for the NPS at Appomattox, that is not true--the Union and Confederate soldiers did indeed play baseball that week, but they played in their own camps, not against each other.

Year
1865
Item
1865.29
Edit
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