Chronology:Business of Baseball

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1857.39 First Baseball Attendance of a Thousand or More

Tags:

Ball in the Culture, Business of Baseball

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"There were thousands of ladies and gentlemen on the ground to witness this game."

Sources:

New York Times, July 10, 1857, about Eagles - Gotham game at the Elysian Fields. Post be Craig Waff on 19cBB, 4/23/2010

Warning:

Lacking enclosed fields, turnstiles or ticket stubs, attendances are only visual estimates.

Comment:

Waff counted 39 attendance estimates of one thousand or more in the NYC area prior to the Civil War.

Year
1857
Item
1857.39
Edit

1857.42 The "X" Letters

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"DEAR SPIRIT:- As the season for playing Ball, and other out-door sports has nearly passed away, and as you have fairly become the chronicle for Cricket and Base Ball, I take the liberty of writing to you, and to the Ball players through you, a few letters, which I hope will prove of some interest to your readers."

Between October 1857 and January 1858, New York- based Porter’s Spirit of the Times, which covered Knickerbocker Rules base ball on a regular basis, published a series of 14 anonymous letters concerning the game. Identifying himself only as “X”, the author’s stated purpose was to “induce some prominent player to write or publish a book on the game.” The letters described the origins of the game, profiled prominent clubs in New York and Brooklyn, offered advice on starting and operating a club, on equipment, and on position play, and, finally, commented on the issues of the day in the base ball community. As the earliest such effort, the letters are of interest as a window into a base ball community poised for the explosive growth which followed the Fashion Race Course games of 1858. 

Sources:

Porter's Spirit of the Times, Oct. 24, 1857 - Jan. 23, 1858

Comment:

The identity of "X" has not been discovered.

Year
1857
Item
1857.42
Edit

1858.2 New York All-Stars Beat Brooklyn All-Stars, 2 games to 1; First Admission Fee [A Dime] Charged

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"The Great Base Ball Match of 1858, which was a best 2 out of 3 games series, embodies four landmark events that are pivotal to the game's history"

1. It was organized base ball's very first all-star game.

2. It was the first base ball game in the New York metropolitan area to be played on an enclosed ground.

3. It marked the first time that spectators paid for the privilege of attending a base ball game -- a fee of 10 cents gave admission to the grounds.

4. The game played on September 10, 1858 is at present [2005] the earliest known instance of an umpire calling strike on a batter."  The New York Game had adopted the called strike for the 1858 season. It is first known to have been employed (many umpires refused to do so) at a New York vs. Brooklyn all-star game at Fashion Race Course on Long Island. The umpire was D.L. (Doc) Adams of the Knickerbockers, who also chaired the National Association of Base Ball Players Rules Committee.  But see Warning, below.

These games are believed to have been the first the newspapers subjected to complete play-by-play accounts, in the New York Sunday Mercury, July 25, 1858.

The New York side won the series, 2 games to 1.  But Brooklyn was poised to become base ball's leading city.

 

 

Sources:

Schaefer, Robert H., "The Great Base Ball Match of 1858: Base Ball's First All-Star Game," Nine, Volume 14, no 1, (2005), pp 47-66. See also Robert Schaefer, "The Changes Wrought by the Great Base Ball Match of 1858," Base Ball Journal, Volume 5, number 1 (Special Issue on Origins), pages 122-126.

Coverage of the game in Porter's Spirit of the Times, July 24, 1858, is reprinted in Dean A. Sullivan, Compiler and Editor, Early Innings: A Documentary History of Baseball, 1825-1908 [University of Nebraska Press, 1995], pp. 27-29.

The Spirit article itself is "The Great Base Ball Match," Spirit of the Times, Volume 28, number 24 (Saturday, July 24, 1858), page 288, column 2. Facsimile provided by Craig Waff, September 2008.

"The All-Star Game You Don't Know", Our Game, http://ourgame.mlblogs.com/2013/07/08/the-all-star-game-you-dont-know/, by John Thorn

See also John Zinn, "The Rivalry Begins: Brooklyn vs. New York", in Inventing Baseball: The 100 Greatest Games of the 19th Century.(SABR, 2013), pp.10-12.

 

Warning:

Richard Hershberger (email of 10/6/2014) points out that the Sunday Mercury account of this game's key at bat "makes it clear that they were swinging strikes."   

Comment:

These games were reoportedly most intensely-covered base ball event to date-- items on the planning and playing of the "Fashion Race Course" games began during the first week in June. Coverage can be found in both the sporting weeklies (New York Clipper, New York Sunday Mercury, Porter's Spirit Of The Times, The Spirit Of The Times) and several dailies (New York Evening Express, New York Evening Post, New York Herald, New York Tribune). Note --Craig Waff turned up 26 news accounts for the fashion games in Games Tab 1.0: see http://protoball.org/Games_Tab:Greater_New_York_City#date1859-9-7.

The Sunday Mercury's path-breaking play-by-play accounts were probably written by Mercury editor William Cauldwell and are enlivened with colorful language and descriptions, such as describing a batting stance as "remindful of Ajax Defying the lamp-lighter", a satire on the classical sculpture, Ajax Defying the Lightning.

This series of games has also been cited as the source of the oldest known base balls:  "Doubts about the claims made for the 'oldest' baseball treasured as relics have no existence concerning two balls of authenticated history brought to light by Charles De Bost . . . . De Bost is the son of Charles Schuyler De Bost, Captain and catcher for the Knickerbocker Baseball Club in the infancy of the game." The balls were both inscribed with the scores of the Brooklyn - NY Fashion Course Games of July and September 1858. Both balls have odd one-piece covers the leather having been cut in four semi-ovals still in one piece, the ovals shaped like the petals of a flower." Source: 'Oldest Baseballs Bear Date of 1858,' unidentified newspaper clipping, January 21, 1909, held in the origins of baseball file at the Giamatti Center at the HOF.

 

 

Query:

If this game did not give us the first called strikes, when did suchactually appear?

Year
1858
Item
1858.2
Edit

1858.4 National Association of Base Ball Players Forms

Tags:

Business of Baseball, Post-Knickerbocker Rule Changes

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"[A] "We should add that the convention have adopted, as the title of the permanent organization, 'The National Association of Base Ball Players,' and the association is delegated with power to act upon, and decide, all questions of dispute, and all departures from the rules of the game, which may be brought before it on appeal."

William H. van Cott is elected NABBP President. The chief amendment to the playing rules was to permit called strikes. The "Fly game" was again rejected, by a vote of 18-15.

[B] "The delegates adopted a constitution and by-laws and began the governance of the game of baseball that would continue [to 1870]."

The NA was not a league in the sense of the modern American and National Leagues, but more of a trade association in which membership as easily obtained. . . .  Admission was open to any club that made a written application . . . and paid a five dollar admission fee and five dollars in annual dues (later reduced to two dollars per year).  The Association met in convention each year, at which time new clubs were admitted."

Sources:

[A] New York Sunday Mercury, April 11, 1858.

Other coverage: New York Evening Express, March 11, 1858; New York Sunday Mercury, March 14 and 28, 1858; Porter's Spirit of the Times, March 20, 1858; New York Herald, March 14, 1858; New York Clipper, March 20 & April 3, 1858.

[B] William Ryczek, Baseball's First Inning (McFarland, 2009), page 49.

 

Comment:

Formation of the NABBP, according to the New York Clipper, was really a "misnomer" because there were "no invitations to clubs of other states," and no one under age 21 can join." "National indeed! Truth is a few individuals wormed into the convention and have been trying to mould men and things to suit their views. If real lovers of the game wish it to spread over the country as cricket is doing they might cut loose from parties who wish to act for and dictate to all who participate. These few dictators wish to ape the New York Yacht Club in their feelings of exclusiveness. Let the discontented come out and organize an association that is really national - extend invitations to base ball players every where to compete with them and make the game truly national."

 

Year
1858
Item
1858.4
Edit

1859.66 Proto-Sports Bar

Tags:

Ball in the Culture, Business of Baseball

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING AND ROAST BEEF FOR DINNER, TO-DAY. Also partridges, green turtle soup, and steaks.

RICHARDSON & McLEOD, 106 Maiden lane, corner Pearl.

Call and see the cricket and base ball books and bulletins.

 

Sources:

New York Herald, Sep. 7, 1859

Comment:

This may not actually have been the first establishment to cater to base ballists. The New York Sunday Mercury noted on Jan. 9, 1859, that "Mr. William P. Valentine, president of the Phantom Base Ball Club, has opened a dining saloon in Broadway, adjoining Wallack's Theatre, which he styles the 'Home Base'."

Year
1859
Item
1859.66
Edit

1859.62 Plea for Amateurism

Game:

Cricket

Age of Players:

Adult

CRICKETING. That eleven men who have devoted their youth and manhood to playing cricket, and have made their living thereby, should be able to beat twice that number who have played that game occasionally for exercise and recreation, is not at all surprising...We have steadily and ardently favored the recent efforts made in this country for the creation and diffusion of a popular taste for muscular outdoor amusements. We believe our industrious people have too few holidays, and devote too few hours to health-giving, open-air recreations... and we should be glad to hear of the inclosure of of a public play-ground, and formation of a ball-club in every township in the Union...But play should be strictly a recreation, never a business. As a pursuit, we esteem it a very bad one...Let us have ball-clubs, cricket-clubs, and as many more such as you please, but not professional cricket-players any more than professional card-players. We trust that the Eleven of All England are to have no imitators on this side of the ocean."

Sources:

New York Tribune, Oct. 8, 1859

Comment:

The All England Eleven played in Canada, New York City, Philadelphia, and Rochester in the fall of 1859, playing on occasion against 22 opponents, to provide competition.

Year
1859
Item
1859.62
Edit

1859.65 New For 1859: Rumors of Player Movement

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] "RESIGNATION-- We understand that Brown (formerly catcher for the Eckford Club), and Post (catcher for the Astoria) have resigned, and become members of the Putnam Base Ball Club. Both of these gentlemen have stood A no. 1 in their respective clubs, and their retirement must prove a serious loss thereto, while the Putnams become materially strengthened by the addition to their number."

[B] "BALL PLAY-- ...We notice that several important changes have taken place in the Brooklyn clubs. Amongst others we learn that Pidgeon, of the Eckford, has joined the Atlantic; Brown, also of the Eckford, has gone into the Putnam club; and Grum in the Excelsior. The Stars have divided themselves, and many of them, Creighton and Flanley in particular, having joined the Excelsior. Dickinson goes into the Atlantic. The trial for the championship, next season, will be between the Atlantic, Excelsior, and Putnam's...We have not heard of any particular changes in the leading clubs of New York...The Union of Morrisania will gain one or two strong players next season.

Sources:

[A] New York Sunday Mercury, Nov. 20, 1859

[B] New York Clipper, Nov. 26, 1859

Comment:

After the Eckford Club contradicted the claim that several  players were resigning and moving to other clubs, the Clipper issued a retraction on December 3: "...we are pleased to learn that it is not correct, for we do not approve of these changes at all." 

Year
1859
Item
1859.65
Edit

1860.18 Juniors Organize in NYC

Tags:

Business of Baseball

Game:

Baseball

Age of Players:

Youth

[A] THE CONVENTION OF THE JUNIOR CLUBS.-- On Friday evening last,in accordance with an invitation from the Powhatan Club, of Brooklyn, a convention of delegates from the junior clubs was held at their rooms, for the purpose of forming an organization for the better regulation of matches...The following delegates were present from their respective clubs: (delegates from 31 clubs listed)

[B] THE JUNIOR CONVENTION.-- The second meeting of the delegates from the Junior Clubs was held , at Brooklyn, and the report of the Committee on Constitutions and By Laws was received and accepted. The Constitution of the Senior organization was accepted with...amendments...the Bylaws of the Seniors were adopted without amendment." The convention adopted the name "National Association of Junior Base Ball Players."

[C] The new association's first meeting convened in New York City on January 9, 1861.

Sources:

[A] New York Sunday Mercury, Oct. 7, 1860

[B]  New York Clipper, Oct. 20, 1860

[C] New York Sunday Mercury, Jan. 20, 1861

Comment:

The Junior clubs had been excluded from membership in the National Association of Base Ball Players at the time of its formation in 1858.

Year
1860
Item
1860.18
Edit

1860.64 The First Enclosed Ballpark

Tags:

Business of Baseball

Location:

Philadelphia

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

In a review of candidates for the title of first enclosed ballpark, Jerrold Casway nominates St. George Cricket Grounds, Camac's Woods, Philadelphia. The site was first enclosed for cricket in 1859 and used for baseball on July 24, 1860.

Sources:

Jerrold Casway, "The First Enclosed Ballpark-- Olympics of Philadelphia vs. St. George", in Inventing Baseball: The 100 Greatest Games of the 19th Century (SABR, 2013), pp. 32-33

Year
1860
Item
1860.64
Edit

1860.69 Knickerbockers, Inc.

Tags:

Business of Baseball

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] 'Our Albany Correspondence.-- ...Some half a dozen notices were sent in this morning for the future introduction of bills (in the New York State Assembly) organizing as many base ball clubs in the City of New York, indicating that the lovers of this game are making extensive preparations to become skilled in the mysteries of the game."

[B] "NEW-YORK LEGISLATURE. ASSEMBLY...BILLS PASSED. ...By Mr. COLE (William L. Cole, New York County 5th District)-- a bill to incorporate the Knickerbocker Base Ball Club of New York. 

[C] "BASE BALL.-- ...We notice in the proceedings of the State Legislature at Albany, that the Knickerbocker Base Ball Club of this city has been chartered. The object of this, we believe, is to enable them to secure from the Central Park commissioners jurisdiction of the ground to be allotted for base ball players.

Sources:

[A] New York Herald, Jan. 14, 1860

[B] New York Tribune, Jan. 21, 1860

[C] New York Sunday Mercury, Feb. 5, 1860

Year
1860
Item
1860.69
Edit

1860.73 Batting Cage Debuts

Tags:

Ball in the Culture, Business of Baseball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] (ad) "CRICKET COURT, 654 BROADWAY.-- CRICKET AND Base Ball Practice.-- The spacious saloon, 654 Broadway, is now open. Gentlemen wishing to perfect themselves in the above game will do well to call, as they will always find wickets pitched and a professional bowler to give instructions to those who require it."

Sources:

[A] New York Herald, April 4, 1860

New York Sunday Mercury, April 8, 1860

Spirit of the Times, June 2, 1860

Year
1860
Item
1860.73
Edit

1860.76 Trade Games Proliferate

Tags:

Ball in the Culture, Business of Baseball

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Games between teams of employees from "commercial establishments" proliferated in 1860, to not everyone's enjoyment:

"A SUGGESTION.-- We observe that matches at base ball are being put up by business establishments. The World and Times newspapers had a match...We presume we shall next have a contest between Spaulding's Prepared Glue and the Retired Physician, or a Standish's Pills nine vs. Townsend's Sarsparilla. Why not? A little gratuitous advertsiing may, perhaps, be got in this way. But, for goodness' sake, gentlemen, don't run the thing into the ground."

Sources:

New York Sunday Mercury, Oct. 7, 1860

Year
1860
Item
1860.76
Edit

1860.77 Treat Us Special

Tags:

Ball in the Culture, Business of Baseball, Newspaper Coverage

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"BASE BALL. ACCOMMODATIONS FOR REPORTING.-- We would suggest to clubs, uponn whose grounds matches are played during the season, the propriety of providing a small table and a few chairs for the accommodation of the press. We have frequently found all the best places for seeing a match monopolized by members of the playing club, while we have been compelled to do our reporting on the back of some kindly-disposed gentleman on the outside circle. The Eckford, Excelsior, and a few other clubs we might name, manage this business better; and all ought to follow their example."

Sources:

New York Sunday Mercury, May 20, 1860

Year
1860
Item
1860.77
Edit

1860.82 Famous Baseballists Turn To Cricket

Tags:

Baseball Professionalism, Business of Baseball

Game:

Cricket

Age of Players:

Adult

CRICKET.-- Long Island vs. Newark.-- The first contest between two American elevens on Long Island took place at East New-York yesterday...considerable interest was created among the base-ball players of Long Island, from the fact that players from each of the first nines of the Excelsior, Atlantic, and Putnam Clubs were to take part in it; and accordingly the largest collection of spectators ever seen on the East New-York grounds collected yesterday...the result was a well contested game of four innings...the time occupied in playing the innings being under five hours, the shortest regular game of cricket on record."

Sources:

New York Tribune, Sep. 6, 1860

Comment:

The players, their names helpfully italicized in the box score, were Edward Pennington and Charles Thomas of the Eureka BBC of Newark, James Creighton and John Whiting of the Excelsior, Dick Pearce and Charley Smith of the Atlantic, and Thomas Dakin of the Putnam. The Brooklyn Daily Eagle noted in its report on Sep. 6 that "The base ball players showed themselves to as much advantage as at their favorite game."

Creighton was successful in cricket both as a bowler and batsman. At the time of his death in Oct. 1862 he was considered the best American player in the New York area.

Year
1860
Item
1860.82
Edit

1861.22 Ad Biz

Tags:

Business of Baseball, Equipment

Game:

Base Ball

"(advertisement) JOHN C. WHITING, 87 FULTON STREET, N. Y., manufacturer of BASE BALLS and Wholesale and Retail Dealer in everything appertaining to BASE BALL and CRICKET. Agent for Chicester's Improved SELF-FASTENING BASES, and the PATENT CONCAVE PLATES for Ball Shoes, which are free from all the danger, and answer all the purposes, of spikes."

Sources:

New York Sunday Mercury, Dec. 8, 1861

Comment:

With thousands in the Greater New York City area playing the game, providers of playing grounds, playing manuals, and equipment sprang up.

Year
1861
Item
1861.22
Edit

1861.45 Shrunken NABBP Meeting Does Little

Tags:

Business of Baseball, Civil War

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"BASE BALL. Annual Meeting of the National Association of Base Ball Players....The attendance of delegates was not so large as we had hope to see..the delegates of thirty-one clubs answered to their names...The Committee on Rules...reported that they had no changes in the Rules to recommend...only one proposition had been submitted to them (discussion of a proposition to change the rule for deciding the outcome of a game called by darkness was tabled; a resolution to donate the Association's surplus funds to war relief was also tabled, as the funds were small...the existing rebellion, which has enlisted amny base-ball players in the service of the country, has had a tendency to temporarily disorganize many of the base ball clubs."

Sources:

New York Sunday Mercury, Dec. 15, 1861

Comment:

Three clubs were admitted to the Association; of 80 existing members, nine were expelled due to non-payment of dues for two years, and 27 more listed who had not paid for 1861.

Year
1861
Item
1861.45
Edit

1862.1 Brooklyn Games Organized as Benefits for Sick and Wounded Soldiers

Location:

NY

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Three games were announced in June 1862 for which net proceeds would be used for sick and wounded Union soldiers. The Eckfords and the Atlantics would play for a silver ball donated by the Continental Club. William Cammeyer provided the enclosed Union grounds without charge. Admission fees of 10 cents were projected to raise $6000 for soldiers' relief. The Eckford won the Silver Ball by winning two of three games.

 

Sources:

"Relief for the Sick and Wounded," Brooklyn Eagle, June 21, 1862, page 2.

Craig Waff, "The 'Silver Ball' Game-- Eckfords vs. Atlantics at the Union Grounds", in Inventing Baseball: The 100 Greatest Games of the 19th Century (SABR, 2013), pp. 39-42

Year
1862
Item
1862.1
Edit

1862.9 First Admission Fees for Baseball?

Tags:

Baseball Professionalism, Business of Baseball, Music

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

May 15, 1862: "The Union Baseball Grounds at March Avenue and Rutledge Street in Brooklyn is opened, the first enclosed ball field to charge an admission fee."

Sources:

James Charlton, The Baseball Chronology (Macmillan, 1991), page 15.

Regarding the opening of the Union Grounds, see:

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Feb. 12 and May 16, 1862; New York Clipper, Feb. 22, 1862; New York Sunday Mercury May 11 and May 18, 1862,

Warning:

Caveats: Admission was charged in 1858 for the Brooklyn-New York games at the Fashion Race Course, Queens, which was enclosed but not a 'ball field'. 

             Before the Union Grounds, there were no ball field enclosed for the purpose of charging admission.

Comment:

Admission had occasionally also been charged for "benefit" games for charities or to honor prominent players.

Year
1862
Item
1862.9
Edit

1863.56 Have Fast Ball Will Travel

Tags:

Baseball Professionalism, Business of Baseball

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] THE ATHLETIC CLUB OF PHILADELPHIA.--...Pratt, the well-known pitcher of the club...has been desirous for some time past of belonging to one of our leading clubs here; and during the visit of the Athletics to New York, Pratt being offered a good situation here, accepted it, and at once had his name proposed as a member of the Atlantic Club...Of course, he will henceforth be their pitcher...His accession to the Atlantic nine will strengthen them in what they have considered their weak point...We presume that the Atlantics will not play their match with the Eckfords until they can get Pratt in their nine..."

[B] "THE ATHLETIC CLUB OF PHILADELPHIA.-- A great change has suddenly occurred in the formation of the first nine of the Athletic club of Philadelphia. Pratt, their able pitcher, resigned from the club the day of his arrival in Philadelphia, the reason he assigned being that he had been offered a good situation in New York, and had joined the Atlantic club of Brooklyn, and henceforth he was to be the pitcher of that noted club, an honor no doubt that he was exceeding ambitious of obtaining."

Sources:

[A] New York Sunday Mercury, July 12, 1863

[B] New York Clipper, July 18, 1863

Comment:

Tom Pratt was age 19.

Year
1863
Item
1863.56
Edit

1863.63 NABBP Curbs Swift Pitching, Swats Fly Rule Again

Tags:

Base Ball Stratagems, Business of Baseball

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

The (NABBP) meeting of December 9 (1863) adopted all recommendations made by the Rules Committee. Though the suggestion of counting wild pitches as runs was not approved, three measures were taken to curb fast, wild pitching: a back line was added to the pitcher’s position, ending the practice of taking a run-up to increase speed, as in cricket; pitchers were required to have both feet on the ground at the time of delivery; and, finally, walks...:

"Should a pitcher repeatedly fail to deliver fair balls to the striker, for the apparent purpose of delaying the game, or for any other cause, the umpire after warning him, shall call one ball, and if the pitcher persists in such action, two and three balls, and when three balls have been called, the striker shall be entitled to his first base, and should any base be occupied at that time each player occupying them shall be entitled to one base.

The exception to the meeting’s unanimous acceptance of the Rules Committee’s action concerned the fly game, which, as with all previous attempts, was rejected, by a vote of 25 to 22. 

Sources:

Robert Tholkes, "A Permanent American Institution: The Base Ball Season of 1863", in Base Ball: A Journal of the Early Game, Vol.7 (2013), pp. 143-153

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Dec. 10, 1863

Year
1863
Item
1863.63
Edit

1863.65 Ravaged By War

Tags:

Business of Baseball, Civil War

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

The Sunday Mercury, in its summary of the (NABBP)  meeting on December 13, 1863, first noted that the disappointing attendance (28 clubs, compared to 32 in 1862)...The convention’s action in dropping 29 clubs, one more than attended the meeting, from the rolls because of inactivity in 1862 and 1863 indicated the scope of the war’s impact...In addition to diminished activity in New York City, Brooklyn, Boston, and Philadelphia, the widespread formation of clubs and beginning of match play in the west and in some southern states before the war came to a halt in most locales. The contributors to Base Ball Pioneers 1850-1870 (Morris et al, eds.,2012) found interclub play on a regular basis continuing in 1863 only in upstate New York and in Michigan’s Lower Peninsula, including its inauguration that year at the University of Michigan. Other places, such as Baltimore, Washington, D. C., Altoona and Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, Chicago and Freeport, Illinois, St. Louis, and perhaps San Francisco) retained single clubs that relied on rare intercity visits for interclub competition. In a far greater number of locales, from Minnesota to Louisiana and from Maine to Augusta and Macon, Georgia, organized play apparently ceased. 

Sources:

Robert Tholkes, "A Permanent American Institution: The Base Ball Season of 1863", in Base Ball: A Journal of the Early Game, Vol. 7 (2013), pp. 143-153

Year
1863
Item
1863.65
Edit

1864.36 NABBP Holds Special Meetings

Tags:

Business of Baseball

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] "THE SPECIAL MEETING OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION.-- Pursuant to a call issued by the President of the National Association of Base-Ball Players, a meeting of the delegates to the last Convention was held at the Gotham Cottage, No. 298 Bowery, on Tuesday evening last, February 23, the object being to take such action as might be necessary to procure an act of incorporation for the association, and also to take into consideration the alleged misconduct of the late Treasurer, in refusing to make a proper transfer of the funds, etc., of the Association to the new incumbent."

[B] "THE MEETING OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION.-- The adjourned meeting of the members of the National Association took place at the Gotham Cottage, No. 298 Bowery, on Tuesday evening last, March 8th...The first business of the meeting being the consideration of the action of the late Treasurer, Mr. Cozans (explained)..that a more satisfactory explanation had been made,..Mr. Brown's affairs, as Treasurer of the Association, would be found to be all correct." 

[C] "The second meeting of the National Association, at Gotham Cottage, Bowery, New York, took place last evening...The principal business was the appointment of three committees...First, a committee to examine into the books and papers of the officers of the association and to ascertain the position and standing of the clubs whose delegates comprise those officials...Second, of a committee to secure an act of incorporation for the association...and third, a committee to meet with the Central Park Commissioners with a view to securing the use of the Park Base Ball Ground this season..."

[D] "THE SPECIAL MEETING OF THE N. A. B. B. PLAYERS (on May 11)...statements were made by members of the three committees referred to..the act of incorporation could not be obtained except from the State Legislature at their next session, and in consequence of this fact the committee on Central Park grounds had not deemed it necessary to take measures to procure the same, as it was requisite that the Association should be a corporate body..."

Sources:


[A] New York Sunday Mercury, February 28, 1864

[B] New York Sunday Mercury, March 13, 1864

[C] Brooklyn Daily Eagle, March 9, 1864

[D] Brooklyn Daily Eagle, May 12, 1864

Year
1864
Item
1864.36
Edit

1864.47 "Union" Games Started 1864 Season

Tags:

Business of Baseball, Post-Knickerbocker Rule Changes

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] "...These practice games are simply nothing more or less than substitutes for the useless and uninteresting ordinarily played on practice days by our first-class clubs. It has been suggested, time and again...that they devote one day in a week...to practicing their men together as a whole against the field; but as yet, not a solitary club has ever practiced their best players together in this way...It is this neglect on the part of or clubs, to improve the character of the practice games on their club grounds, that has led to the arrangement of these Union Practice Games.”

[B] “THE GRAND PRIZE-MATCH IN BROOKLYN. The prize-game of the series of Union practice-games inaugurated by Mr. Chadwick, which took place on Saturday, May 21st...proved to be a complete success in every respect, and one of the best-played and most interesting games seen for several seasons past...(it) afforded those present proof of the advantage of such a class of games...”

[C] “THE SECOND PRIZE-GAME IN BROOKLYN.—...the Atlantics refused to play according to the rules of these series of games...They also seemed to regard the match as one on which their standing as a playing-club was concerned, rather than...one of a series of games designed to test the merits of the flygame.”

[D] "The Eckford was defeated by the field at the so-called prize game, and the Atlantic won the game with the field. The prize game, so far as it interferes with the rules of the Convention, should be frowned down by all clubs, as it was repudiated by the Atlantic and Enterprise clubs.”

 

Sources:

[A] Brooklyn Daily Eagle, May 21, 1864

[B] Wilkes' Spirit of the Times, May 28, 1864

[C] New York Sunday Mercury, June 5, 1864

[D] New York Evening Express, June 13, 1864

Comment:

See Supplemental Text for further newspaper coverage.

Year
1864
Item
1864.47
Edit
Source Text

1865.10 New England Association Formed

Tags:

Business of Baseball

Location:

MA

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] "...the fact is, the Massachusetts and Maine players are so far removed from New York, that they cannot conveniently participate in the meetings of the National Association, and therefore they purpose setting up a duplicate institution...They will, of course, indorse the rules of the National Association...At a meeting lately held at the rooms of the Tri-Mountain Club, the following resolutions were adopted...Resolved, That the Tri-Mountain Base ball Club us its utmost influence and endeavors to secure the formation and organization of a New England Convention of National Baseball Players." 

[B] "...A preliminary meeting of Delegates from those Clubs who propose joining the New England Convention of National Base Ball Players will be held on WEDNESDAY next, Oct. 25th, at 12 M., at the Hancock House, Court square, Boston...The following named Clubs have signified their intention of taking part...Tri-Mountain, of Boston, Fly-Away of East Boston, Harvard of Cambridge, Granite of Holliston, King Phillip of East Abingdon, Dictator of Newton, Continental of Newtonville."

[C] "N. E. CONVENTION OF BASE BALL CLUBS.-- A convention of delegates from the Dictator, Eureka, Electric, Fly-Away, Granite, Harvard, King Phillip, Lightfoot, Lowell, Orient, and Tri-Mountain Base Ball Clubs, was held at the Hancock House, yesterday...the association shall be called the New England Association of National Base Ball Clubs."

Sources:

[A] New York Sunday Mercury, Feb. 19, 1865

[B] Boston Herald, Oct. 21, 1865

[C] Boston Herald, Nov. 9, 1865

Year
1865
Item
1865.10
Edit

1865.12 "Professional" Players? Yes. Playing For Money? No

Tags:

Baseball Professionalism, Business of Baseball

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] "THE MUTUAL CLUB AND THEIR GROUNDS. The Mutual Club...have rented the enitre ground (at the Elysian Fields)...their object being to afford equal opportunities for both the 'professional' and amateur players of the club to enjoy practice to their hearts' content."

[B] "PLAYING BASEBALL FOR MONEY.-- ...We trust never to see our national pastime brought down to the level of contests in the prize ring of pugilism. The honor of incasing the ball as the only trophy of victory in a match is sufficient without bringing pecuniary rewards into the game as incentives for extra efforts. When the time arrives for money to be made the object in playing ball, then good-bye to friendly contests and the rule of gentlemanly ball-players..."

Sources:

[A] New York Sunday Mercury, May 7, 1865

[B] New York Sunday Mercury, July 30, 1865

 

Year
1865
Item
1865.12
Edit

1865.13 Elysian? Yes. Sacred? No.

Tags:

Ball in the Culture, Business of Baseball

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"The old (Elysian Field baseball) grounds have lately been greatly improved. Trees have been cut down, rocks have been taken up, hollows filled up and hills levelled, and in fact everything has been done to make the field one of the finest ball grounds in the country. Permanent seats are to be placed on the boundary line set apart for spectators, and henceforth no difficulty will be experienced in keeping the crowd from interfering with the players around the catcher's and first and third base player's positions."

Sources:

New York Clipper, May 13, 1865

Year
1865
Item
1865.13
Edit

1865.21 Fitz Credited With Originating Tournaments

Tags:

Business of Baseball

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

“To the untiring exertions of Col. (Thomas) Fitzgerald, the worthy President of the Athletic, is due the inauguration of the ‘tournament’, which has awakened such a wide-spread interest in all parts of the country...” 

Sources:

Philadelphia Illustrated New Age, Nov. 1, 1865

Comment:

Few and far between in prior years, festivals or tournaments mushroomed in 1865, for example:

Portland, ME—at July 4 celebration. Open to all teams in ME, considered for state championship. 4 teams entered, knockout competition. 2 games at a time in the morning, championship game in the afternoon. 9 innings. Cash prizes for 1st and 2nd. Portland Daily Evening Advertiser coverage on July 6 indicated that the only out-of-town team was subject to “expressions of strong sympathy against them.”

Altoona, PA- per a reprint in Fitzgerald's City Item (Philadelphia) on 7/22, Altoona Tribune was promoting a baseball carnival—Athletics, Mountain Club of Altoona, and Alleghany Club of Pittsburg

Wash DC- Games on 8/28 between the Nationals and Athletics, 8/29 between the Nationals and the Atlantic of Brooklyn, “a festival such has never before been offered in Washington”. Washington Daily National Intelligencer, 8/28

Wash DC- Oct. 9-11 tourney had the Excelsior of Brooklyn, the Nationals, and the Enterprise of Baltimore. Round robin, one game per day. Wilkes Spirit of the Times, 10/21

Wilkes Spirit of the Times on Oct. 21 printed a letter from Chicago describing problems encountered at a tourney in Rockford, IL. 5 teams, two days, two games each day.

Year
1865
Item
1865.21
Edit

1865.23 NABBP Meeting Sets Attendance Record

Tags:

Business of Baseball, Post-Knickerbocker Rule Changes

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] "The ninth annual convention...proved to be most numerously attended...ever held...over ninety clubs were present."

[B] "...forty-eight clubs from New York State; fourteen from Pennsylvania; thirteen from New Jersey; four from Connecticut; four from Washington, D. C.; two from Massachusetts; and one each from Kansas, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Maine, making a grand total of 91 clubs represented..."

Sources:

[A] Brooklyn Daily Eagle, December 15, 1865

[B] New York Clipper, December 23, 1865

Year
1865
Item
1865.23
Edit

1865.25 Three Mutuals Banned for "Heaving" Game to Eckfords for $100

Tags:

Bans, Business of Baseball

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"On September 27, 1865, gambler Kane McLoughlin paid $100 collectively to three [Mutual] players to heave, in the favored term of the period, a game the following day to the Eckfords.  . . .  in the fifth inning the Mutuals amazingly allowed eleven runs to score through [what the NYTimes described as] 'over-pitched balls, wild throws, passed balls, and failures to stop them in the field.' "

The Mutuals obtained confessions and banned catcher Bill Wamsley and two others.  John Thorn cites this as base ball's first game-fixing incident.

Sources:

John Thorn, Baseball in the Garden of Eden (Simon and Schuster, 2011), page 127.  The book includes [pp. 128-129] the written confession of the youngest plotter, Tom Devyr, whom the Mutuals reinstated the following year. 

See also Philip Dixon, "The First Fixed Game-- Eckfords vs. Mutuals", in Inventing Baseball: The 100 Greatest Games of the 19th Century (SABR, 2013), pp.46-48.

Year
1865
Item
1865.25
Edit

1866.7 Twienty-Five Cent Admission Fees Appear

Tags:

Business of Baseball

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

[A] "Owing to his heavy expenditures and with a laudable desire to keep out the "rowdy element" that has so often disgraced our base ball fields, Mr. Cammyer. has changed, or rather will change, the price of admission to twenty-five cents for a single ticket." 

[B] (At) "The Athletic grounds...The tariff of admission was raised from 10 to 25 cents to keep the boys out, for our juveniles are as badly brought up that they are the foremost in creating disturbances at exciting ball matches."

[C] "

     The excessively large crowds of people who have been attracted to witness the championship-games this fall, and the profits arising therefrom which have been realized by the parties having control of inclosed grounds, have led to evils which, if allowed to pass unnoticed, will ere long bring baseball into great disrepute, lower the high standard of our national game, and place the fraternity in the hands of the gambling-community.
     The National Association does not recognize championship-matches or any such title as the "champion club," and the only legitimate object of every contest is the simple trophy of the ball. Of late, we regret to state, clubs have been allured into playing "big matches" for "gate-money", or a share of the receipts for admission to inclosed grounds. Proprietors of inclosed grounds have never made a greater mistake for their own interests, or aimed a more severe blow at the welfare of the game, than when they were led into consenting to share their legitimate profits with the clubs occupying their grounds or desiring to play contests upon them. Every lover of the game, and ever may who does not make ball-playing a "profession" or a business, is "down upon" this playing ball for gate-money. All those who have invested capital in inclosed ballgrounds, and who thereby furnish fair fields and respectable localities for games, besides special facilities for clubs, are fully entitled to every cent of their receipts. And every club who deems it advisable for the permanence of their organization to purchase or lease land and inclose a ground for their won use, are equally entitled to any profits legitimately derived from their investments. But for clubs to go round from one party to another, soliciting alms in the way of a share of receipts, is about the smallest kind of business an independent club can be engaged in. Hitherto first-class matches have been enjoyed on the inclosed ground a Brooklyn, for the small sum of ten cents admission, an amount none object to, and on such an occasion as the match of October 8, when tens of thousands of spectators seek to occupy a position on a field that will not accommodate half who desire admission; and extra charge for the purpose of having an orderly assemblage is excusable; but this charging of 25 cents admission, because the proprietors of the grounds are forced into sharing receipts with money-making clubs, is something we hope to see the baseball public put a stop to, and that by staying away from such matches. This evil will work its own cure, however. Already its effect has been to place the Atlantic and the Athletic clubs in the position of being suspected of the dishonorable deed of "throwing" a game in order to have the opportunity of sharing the profits of a third match. The thing is about played out already. It may safely be put down that every match where more than the regular 10 cents admission is charged is a match got up for the benefit of the two clubs playing, and therefore is to be let alone and not patronized."
Sources:

[A] Brooklyn Daily Eagle, August 14, 1866

[B] New York Tribune, October 1, 1866

[C] New York Sunday Mercury, October 28, 1866

Query:

 

 

Year
1866
Item
1866.7
Edit

1867.7 Nationals Inaugurate Western Tours

Tags:

Business of Baseball

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"...the Nationals (of Washington, DC)...were the first Eastern club to widely "tour." And so among their other accomplishments should be noted their popularizing of the "tour" which came to dominate the baseball seasons of 1868, 1869 and 1870, before the National Association began in 1871...these tours did much to help convince club owners and supporters that baseball could sustain a professional existence."

Sources:

Greg Rhodes,19cbb post June 17, 2002

Year
1867
Item
1867.7
Edit

1867.13 Moneyball 1867

Tags:

Baseball Professionalism, Business of Baseball

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"Many will be surprised to learn that the Atlantics have vacated the scene of their greatest triumphs, and have located themselves on the Eckford grounds, or rather the Union ball grounds, in Williamsburgh, entirely out of the way of the residence of the majority of their members, and in opposition to the wishes of many of the best men in their club. It would appear from all accounts that the present ruler of the club, failing to make any advantageous arrangement with Weed & Decker for a greater share of the proceeds in match days than the players received last year, and finding Cammeyer of the Union grounds ready to offer good terms to secure the club, they availed themselves of the latter offer of sixty per cent of the receipts and closed with him at once. But this being against the rules of the association, they made out a new form of agreement and hired the grounds after paying forty per cent of the receipts taken in lieu of rent. They change will not benefit the club, and it is the worst precedent Cammeyer could have adopted as all clubs can now fully claim a share of the sale money."

Sources:

New York Daily News, April 21, 1867, per 19cbb post by Richard Hershberger, Sep. 30, 2013

Comment:

1867 would be a watershed year for baseball finances.  At the beginning of the season ten cents was still the standard admission.  Midway through the season some clubs would experiment with twenty-five cent admissions.  It turned out that the public was willing to pay this, and this changed everything.  At ten cents the receipts paid for expenses, but only the top draws like the Atlantics and the Athletics could turn a significant profit.  At twenty-five cents this opened up a revenue stream to many more clubs, and the fraternity found itself awash with cash (at least compared to previously).  A similar thing would happen a century or so later with television money.  The effect in the 1860s was to lock in professionalism.  By 1868 there were openly professional picked nine games being played, and the following year they dropped the pretense entirely.

Year
1867
Item
1867.13
Edit

1869.7 Cincinnati Club Forms as First All-Professional Nine

Tags:

Baseball Professionalism, Business of Baseball

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Notables:

Harry Wright, George Wright

"In the fall of 1868, a group of Cincinnati businessmen and lawyers, serving as directors of the Cincinnati Base Ball Club, agreed to a concept so commonplace today that it is difficult to imagine how risky it seemed at the time. The club would recruit the best players it could find, from around the country (and), pay all the players a salary..." 

 

 

Sources:

Rhodes, Greg & Erardi, John, The First Boys of Summer. Road West Publishing Co., 1994, p.4

Year
1869
Item
1869.7
Edit

1871.3 Coup d'grace for the Amateur Era

Tags:

Baseball Professionalism, Business of Baseball, Championship Games

Game:

Base Ball

"In March 1871, ten members of the National Association met in New York for the purpose of forming a new group...This act essentially killed the National Association."

Sources:

Marshall Wright, The National Association of Base Ball Players, 1857-1870, p.328

Year
1871
Item
1871.3
Edit


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