Difference between revisions of "1086.1"

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{{Chronology Entry
 
{{Chronology Entry
 +
|Year=1086
 +
|Year Number=1
 
|Headline=Form of Stool Ball Possibly Found in Domesday Book in Norman England
 
|Headline=Form of Stool Ball Possibly Found in Domesday Book in Norman England
|Year=1086
 
 
|Salience=2
 
|Salience=2
 +
|Tags=Females,
 +
|Country=England
 
|Game=Stoolball
 
|Game=Stoolball
|Tags=Females
+
|Immediacy of Report=Contemporary
 
|Text=<p>Stool ball, a stick and ball game and a forerunner of rounders and cricket, is apparently mentioned in the Domesday Book as "bittle-battle."</p>
 
|Text=<p>Stool ball, a stick and ball game and a forerunner of rounders and cricket, is apparently mentioned in the Domesday Book as "bittle-battle."</p>
<p><b>Note:</b> This source is Henderson, Robert W., <u>Ball, Bat and Bishop: The Origins of Ball Games</u> [Rockport Press, 1947], p. 75. However, Henderson doesn't exactly endorse the idea that the cited game, "bittle-battle," is a ball game [or if it is, could it be a form of soule?] He says that one [unnamed] author claims that bittle-battle is a form of stoolball. I saw only two RH refs to stoolball, ref 72 [Grantham] and ref 149 [London Magazine]. One of them may be Henderson's source for the 1086 stoolball claim. I don't see an RH ref to the Domesday text itself, but then, it probably isn't found at local lending libraries. The <u>Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect</u> [1875] reportedly gives "bittle-battle" as another name for stoolball. It is believed that "bittle" meant a wooden milk bowl and some have speculated that a bowl may have been used as a paddle to deflect a thrown ball from the target stool, while others speculate that the bowl may have been the target itself.</p>
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<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p><b>Note:</b> We need to confirm whether the Domesday Book actually uses the term "bittle-battle," "stool ball," or what. We also should try to ascertain views of professional scholars on the interpretations of the Book. Martin Hoerchner advises that the British Public Records Office may, at some point, make parts of the Domesday Book available online.</p>
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|Sources=<p><strong>Note:</strong> This source is Henderson, Robert W., <span style="text-decoration: underline;">Ball, Bat and Bishop: The Origins of Ball Games</span> [Rockport Press, 1947], p. 75.</p>
 +
|Comment=<p>Henderson doesn't exactly endorse the idea that the cited game, "bittle-battle," is a ball game [or if it is, could it be a form of soule?] He says that one [unnamed] author claims that bittle-battle is a form of stoolball. I saw only two&nbsp;Henderson refs to stoolball, ref 72 [Grantham] and ref 149 [London Magazine]. One of them may be Henderson's source for the 1086 stoolball claim. I don't see a Henderson&nbsp;ref to the Domesday text itself, but then, it probably isn't found at local lending libraries.</p>
 +
<p>The <span style="text-decoration: underline;">Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect</span> [1875] reportedly gives "bittle-battle" as another name for stoolball. It is believed that "bittle" meant a wooden milk bowl and some have speculated that a bowl may have been used as a paddle to deflect a thrown ball from the target stool, while others speculate that the bowl may have been the target itself.</p>
 +
|Query=<p>&nbsp;</p>
 +
<p><strong>Note:</strong> We need to confirm whether the Domesday Book actually uses the term "bittle-battle," "stool ball," or what. We also should try to ascertain views of professional scholars on the interpretations of the Book. Martin Hoerchner advises that the British Public Records Office may, at some point, make parts of the Domesday Book available online.</p>
 
|Reviewed=Yes
 
|Reviewed=Yes
 +
|Has Supplemental Text=No
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|Coordinates=52.3555177, -1.1743197
 
}}
 
}}

Latest revision as of 18:19, 9 May 2015

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Form of Stool Ball Possibly Found in Domesday Book in Norman England

Salience Noteworthy
Tags Females
City/State/Country: England
Game Stoolball
Immediacy of Report Contemporary
Text

Stool ball, a stick and ball game and a forerunner of rounders and cricket, is apparently mentioned in the Domesday Book as "bittle-battle."

 

Sources

Note: This source is Henderson, Robert W., Ball, Bat and Bishop: The Origins of Ball Games [Rockport Press, 1947], p. 75.

Comment

Henderson doesn't exactly endorse the idea that the cited game, "bittle-battle," is a ball game [or if it is, could it be a form of soule?] He says that one [unnamed] author claims that bittle-battle is a form of stoolball. I saw only two Henderson refs to stoolball, ref 72 [Grantham] and ref 149 [London Magazine]. One of them may be Henderson's source for the 1086 stoolball claim. I don't see a Henderson ref to the Domesday text itself, but then, it probably isn't found at local lending libraries.

The Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect [1875] reportedly gives "bittle-battle" as another name for stoolball. It is believed that "bittle" meant a wooden milk bowl and some have speculated that a bowl may have been used as a paddle to deflect a thrown ball from the target stool, while others speculate that the bowl may have been the target itself.

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Query

 

Note: We need to confirm whether the Domesday Book actually uses the term "bittle-battle," "stool ball," or what. We also should try to ascertain views of professional scholars on the interpretations of the Book. Martin Hoerchner advises that the British Public Records Office may, at some point, make parts of the Domesday Book available online.

Edit with form to add a query

Expression error: Unexpected > operator.


Comments

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