In Honolulu in 1855

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Awaiting Review
Date of Game 1855
Game Wicket
Location Honolulu, HI, United States
Field  Add Field Page Punahou school
Has Source On Hand No
NY Rules No - Predecessor
Description

Punahou school was playing wicket in 1855. An 1859 wicket game is already entered into protobnall for Honolulu.

[A] "In 1855 the new game of wicket was introduced at Punahou [School] and for a few years was the leading athletic game on the campus. . . . [The] fiercely contested games drew many spectators from among the young ladies and aroused no common interest among the friends of the school."

[B] "One game they all enjoyed was wicket, often watched by small Mary Burbank. Aipuni, the Hawaiians called it, or rounders, perhaps because the bat had a large rounder end. It was a forerunner of baseball, but the broad, heavy bat was held close to the ground."

[3] Through further digging, John Thorn traces the migration of wicket to Hawaii through the Hawaii-born missionary Henry Obookiah. At age 17, Obookiah traveled to New Haven and was educated in the area. He died there in 1818, but not before helping organize a ministry [Episcopalian?] t\in Hawaii that began in 1820.

Sources:

[A] J. S. Emerson, "Personal Reminiscences of S. C. Armstrong," The Southern Workman Volume 36, number 6 (June 1907), pages 337-338. Accessed 2/12/10 via Google Books search ("punahou school" workman 1907). Punahou School, formerly Oahu College, is in Honolulu.

[B] Damon M. Ethel, Sanford Ballard Dole and His Hawaii [Pacific Books, Palo Alto, 1957], page 41. 

[C] John's source is the pamphlet Hawaiian Oddities, by Mike Jay [R. D. Seal, Seattle, ca 1960]. [Personal communication, 7/26/04.]

Comment:

Damon added: "Aipuni, the Hawaiians called it, or rounders, perhaps because the bat had a larger rounder end.t was a a forerunner of baseball, but the broad, heavy bat was held close to thee ground."

Sources

Baseball Chronology, with additions.

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Submitted by Bruce Allardice



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