Chronology:NY

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1846.20 Very Early Knicks Game Washed Out . . . in Brooklyn

Location:

Brooklyn, NY

Game:

Cricket

Age of Players:

Adult

"Sporting Intelligence.

"Brooklyn Star Cricket Club.The first meeting of this association for the
season came off yesterday, on their ground in the Myrtle avenue.The
weather was most unfavorable for the sport promised---a game of cricket
between the members of the club, a base ball game between the members of
the Knickerbocker Club . . . , Shortly after, a violent storm of wind, hail, and
rain came on, which made them desist from their endeavors for some time,
and the company which was somewhat numerous, left the
ground. Notwithstanding, like true cricketers, the majority of the club
kept the field, but not with much effect.The wind, hail, rain, and snow
prevailed to such extent that play was out of the question; but they did
the best they could, and in the first innings the seniors of the club
made some 48, while the juniors only scored some 17 or 18.The game was
not proceeded with further."

Sources:

 N. Y. Herald April 14, 1846.

Comment:

This item is extracted from a 19CBB interchange among Bob Tholkes, John Thorn, and Richard Hershberger, which touched on the somewhat rare later travels of the Knickerbockers and the nature and conditions of several playing fields from 185 to 1869.  Text is included as Supplement Text below.

Year
1846
Item
1846.20
Edit
Source Text

1850s.40 Future Historian Plays Ball in NYC Streets

Location:

New York City, NY

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Juvenile

"During the winter my time was spent at school and at such sports as city boys could have.  Our playground was the street and a vacant lot on the corner of Fourteenth Street and Second Avenue.  Behind its high fence plastered with advertisements, we played baseball with the soft ball of that day."

The author, John Bach McMaster (b. 1852), later wrote The History of the People of the United States, published in 1883.

 

Sources:

John Back McMaster, quoted in "Young John Bach McMaster: A Boyhood in New York City," New York History, volume 20, number 3, (July 1939), pp. 320-321.  Noted in Originals. v.4, n.11 (November 2011), page 2.

Decade
1850s
Item
1850s.40
Edit

1859.71 Hidden Ball Trick is Effective as a "Dodge" for the Atlantic Club

Location:

Brooklyn, NY

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

 

"Flannelly, the first striker, was put out at the second base by a dodge on the part of Oliver, who made a feint to throw the ball, and had it hid under his arm, by which he caught Flannelly -- an operation, however, which we do not much admire."

Bob Tholkes reports that the play was made by Joe Oliver of the Atlantic Club in the seventh inning of a game with the Star Club of Brooklyn. 

 

 

 

Sources:

Sunday Mercury, October 23, 1859

Year
1859
Item
1859.71
Edit

1861.34 Regiment Plays “Favorite Game” After Dress Parade in Elmira NY

Location:

NY

Age of Players:

Adult

“After [the camp’s dress] parade, which generally lasted about an hour, the camp was alive with fun and frolic . . . leap-frog, double-duck, foot and base-ball or sparring, wrestling, and racing, shared their attention.”

J. Harrison Mills, Chronicles of the Twenty-First Regiment, New York Volunteers (21st Veteran Assn., Buffalo, 1887), page 42. The newly-formed regiment, evidently raised in the Buffalo area, was at camp in Elmira in May 1861 in this recollection, and would deploy to Washington in June. A visitor to the camp wrote the next day, “I was not surprised . . . to see how extensively the amusements which had been practiced in their leisure hours in the city [Buffalo?], were continued in camp. Boxing with gloves, ball-playing, running and jumping, were among these. The ball clubs were well represented here, and the exercise of their favorite game is carried on spiritedly by the Buffalo boys.” [page 43.]

Differences from Modern Baseball: 123
Comment:

Duplicate of 1861.16?

Year
1861
Item
1861.34
External
123
Edit

1861.51 Ball Playing competes with fencing in camp

Location:

NY

Age of Players:

Adult

The Ogdensburg Advance, Aug. 23, 1861 picks up an Albany Journal item about life in camp: "The People's Ellsworth Regiment spends their leisure hours "in great part to athletic exercises--fencing, boxing, ball playing--while their evenings are passed in singing."

This unit was the 44th New York Infantry, which at this time was in camp near Albany, NY.

Sources:

The Ogdensburg Advance, Aug. 23, 1861

Year
1861
Item
1861.51
Edit

1861.57 Wilson's Zouaves play base ball

Location:

NY

Age of Players:

Adult

The St. Louis Missouri Democrat, May 21, 1861 prints a may 16 letter from the camp of Wilson's Zouaves, on Staten Island, NY: "We found a  majority of the force engaged in exercise--some at base ball, some at leap frog--others running, boxing, exercise..."

Zouaves were dressed in the style of the North African light infantry of the French army--short red coats, baggy pants--very colorful.

Sources:

The St. Louis Missouri Democrat, May 21, 1861. New York Herald, May 16, 1861.

Year
1861
Item
1861.57
Edit

1861.69 Pitching Quoits and Playing Ball

Location:

NY

Age of Players:

Adult

The New York Herald, May 14, 1861 reports on Col. Allen's regiment, the 1st NY National Guard, camped on Staten Island: "The hours of recreation are generally employed by the men in pitching quoits and playing ball."

Sources:

The New York Herald, May 14, 1861

Year
1861
Item
1861.69
Edit

1861.70 Excelsior Brigade amuses itself

Location:

NY

Age of Players:

Adult

The New York Herald, May 23, 1861, reports on the Excelsior Brigade (a NYC unit), camped at Red House, Harlem: "During the time that the men are at leisure they amuse themselves by boxing, playing ball, jumping, running, or an any other harmless way they may see fit."

Sources:

The New York Herald, May 23, 1861

Year
1861
Item
1861.70
Edit

1861.76 Base ball in Rochester Camp

Location:

NY

Age of Players:

Adult

"A traveler going south out of Rochester on Mt. Hope Avenue during the war years would pass by Mt. Hope Cemetery, and then, just past the fork in the road formed by the West and East Henrietta roads, would come to the entrance of a military camp. Inside, he might glimpse an artillery company hard at drill, while off-duty recruits played a game of baseball."

This is Camp Hillhouse, in Rochester, NY.

Sources:

Levy and Tynan, "Campgrounds of the Civil War," Rochester History, Summer 2004, p. 6.

Year
1861
Item
1861.76
Edit

1862.1 Brooklyn Games Organized as Benefits for Sick and Wounded Soldiers

Location:

NY

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

Three games were announced in June 1862 for which net proceeds would be used for sick and wounded Union soldiers. The Eckfords and the Atlantics would play for a silver ball donated by the Continental Club. William Cammeyer provided the enclosed Union grounds without charge. Admission fees of 10 cents were projected to raise $6000 for soldiers' relief. The Eckford won the Silver Ball by winning two of three games.

 

Sources:

"Relief for the Sick and Wounded," Brooklyn Eagle, June 21, 1862, page 2.

Craig Waff, "The 'Silver Ball' Game-- Eckfords vs. Atlantics at the Union Grounds", in Inventing Baseball: The 100 Greatest Games of the 19th Century (SABR, 2013), pp. 39-42

Year
1862
Item
1862.1
Edit

1862.60 Confederate POWs play baseball in New York City

Location:

NY

Game:

Base Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

May 9, 1862: "This morning we received balls and bats from New York and have organized a regular Base Ball Club. We have been playing considerable today and I feel quite fine in consequence."

"A Confederate Yankee: The Journal of Edward William Drummond,a Confederate Soldier from Maine" (Drummond and Roger S. Durham), p. 51.

Drummond, along with his Savannah "Chatham Artillery" unit, were captured at Fort Pulaski, outside Savanna, and taken to Governors Island POW camp in New York harbor. The next month he and his comrades play baseball almost daily. 

Drummond was a Maine-born bookkeeper in Savannah at the start of the war. This entry suggests that his fellow townsmen were perfectly familiar with the game of base ball.

Sources:

"A Confederate Yankee: The Journal of Edward William Drummond,a Confederate Soldier from Maine" (Drummond and Roger S. Durham), p. 51.

 

Year
1862
Item
1862.60
Edit

1862.66 In camp near Rochester, New York

Location:

NY

Age of Players:

Adult

The Brockport (NY) Republic, Oct. 2, 1862 prints a letter from Camp Fitz John Porter, Sept. 24, 1862, from a member of the 140th NY: "The boys are playing ball, writing to friends, and some are target shooting..."

The camp was at/near Rochester, NY.

Sources:

The Brockport (NY) Republic, Oct. 2, 1862

Year
1862
Item
1862.66
Edit

1863.86 Draftees Play Ball on Rikers Island

Location:

NY

Age of Players:

Adult

The Boston Herald, Sept. 8, 1863 notes that at the Riker's Island, NY camp for draftees, "Fishing, base-ball, quoits, and other healthful amusements, are among their daily engagements."

Riker's Island is near Manhattan.

Sources:

The Boston Herald, Sept. 8, 1863

Year
1863
Item
1863.86
Edit


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