Chronology:Ball

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1795.6 Future Tennessee Governor, at age 50, "Played at Ball"

Tags:

Famous

Game:

Ball

Age of Players:

Adult

"Sat. [August] 22 played at ball self and son John vs. Messrs Aitken and Anderson beat them four Games."

Sources:

The Journal of John Sevier, published in Vols V and VI of the Tennessee Historical Magazine, 1919-1920.

See http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/America/United_States/Tennessee/_Texts/THM/5/3/Sevier_Journal/1795*.html

Accessed via <sevier "22 played at ball"> search, 6/30/2014.

Comment:

Editor's footnote #73 (1919?): "'Played at ball.' Sevier and son beat their antagonists four games.  There were not enough (players?) for town-ball, nor for baseball, evolved from town-ball, and not yet evolved.  There were not enough for bullpen.  The game was probably cat-ball."

Revolutionary War veteran John Sevier was nearly 50 years old in August 1795.  He became Tennessee's first governor in the following year.  His son John was 29 in 1795.

 

 

 

Year
1795
Item
1795.6
Edit

1836.13 "Errant Rogue," in Poem, Prefers Ball to Study

Tags:

College

Game:

Ball

Age of Players:

Youth

The Dissipated Collegian

 

"Tis said there was a certain wight,

Whose mother-wit was very bright,

An errant rogue, and even bolder

Than many rogues a good deal older;  . . . 

This wight of ours disdained to study

And hated books in soul and body;

His lessons, therefore, were neglected

Though he as often was corrected;

But when there was a chance to play,

Our rogue would slily run away;

Yet, had he given due attention,

(So powerful was his comprehension,)

He might have been the first of all

In science, as in playing ball;

He might have done as great exploits

In study as in pitching quoits; . . . .

Sources:

Selection of Juvenile and Miscellaneous Poems, Written or Translated  by Roswell Park, (Desilver, Thomas ad Co., Philadelphia, 1836),. page 44.  

Comment:

 

Roswell Park was born at Lebanon, Conn., in 1807, graduated at West Point, and at Union College in 1831. He died July 16, 1869.  Whether he was an errant wight is not yet known by Protoball.

Query:

Was "collegian" a term for a university student, back then?

Year
1836
Item
1836.13
Edit


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